Joe Mellor

Joe Mellor

Head of News & Social Media at The London Economic

Is the Senate fighting peace?

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent The negotiations that no one, especially American leaders, ever truly believed would happen are, indeed, happening. On January 20th, Iran will enter into negotiations to reduce their nuclear practices with the United States, Great Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia. The new, “more liberal” Iranian president,...

Hollande’s dangerous liaisons

By Pieter Cranenbroek – International Politics Blogger On New Year’s Eve, French President François Hollande announced a series of liberal reforms that meant a move away from socialist thinking. Although the socialist president’s alleged liaison with an actress may have overshadowed his astonishing flirt with liberalism, he would do well to...

Making Winter Warmer

Kerry Lister-Pattinson – 28, founder Making Winter Warmer I'm the type of person who really feels the cold. One especially freezing November night in 2013 a thought popped into my head; 'what must it be like for people living on the streets?' It was that thought that led me on to...

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

By Nathan Lee, Finance and Politics Correspondent  Martin Scorsese’s Wolf of Wall Street rubs salt in the wounds of those most affected by the financial crisis and massages the ego of the bankers who allowed it all to happen.   Five years on from the greatest financial crisis in history and...

No Strings

A No Strings Puppet Workshop For Children From Syria By Rosie Waller, No Strings International  No Strings International makes puppet films that bring to life crucial messages for children in disasters, poverty and war around the world, with their current focus on Syria. Here, Rosie Waller, one of the UK team...

Youth employment: a call to action

By Carlotta Stephens, Commercial Director, Maine-Tucker As a corporate member of the REC (Recruitment and Employment Confederation) I recently attended an event at the House of Lords on the topic of youth employment. Staggeringly there are nearly one million young people in the UK who are neither in work, training or...

Politics and Economics; Opposing Forces

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent Politics & Economics: Two Forces Pulling Against Each Other Following the US Government shutdown in late 2013 there has been speculation surrounding the fragility of global economic wellbeing when it is at the mercy of party politics, in particular when a few idealists manage to halt...

Erdoğan’s Naked Theatre of Democracy

By Jim Colella, freelance journalist and blogger, resident in Turkey since 2005  The epic corruption scandal currently gripping Turkey, not to mention international headlines, is nothing less than the collapse of the entire set on a theatre stage. With that elaborately painted background suddenly gone, so too goes the context...

Ulster says No

By Tomás McGoldrick, Ireland Correspondent Northern Irish talks - Ulster says No The failure of  Northern Irish parties to reach agreement on Richard Haass’s proposals is hardly surprising. Trying to resolve the issues of parades, flags and events of the past in six months was simply too much to ask for...

The Israeli Spring

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic  Al Arish Road winds along North Africa’s north coast from Cairo, the largest city in the Middle-East and the nucleus of the Arab Spring. From Tahrir Square it’s a five hour drive to the Israeli border, passing through Arish, the capital of...

Britain’s year of hard truths

By Pieter Cranenbroek – International Politics Blogger The new year has only just begun but whatever optimism people may have had at the turn of the year, it most likely will have vanished into thin air thanks to our wonderful Chancellor, George Osborne. Although Britain is slowly showing signs of economic...

Just another day in Hebron

By Luca Foschi The bus I am riding in has come from Jerusalem, the occupied capital. It stops in front of Shuhada Street, where a rain of stones are lobbed towards the check point which has separated Hebron into two sections from 1997: H1, under the rule of the Palestinian...

High time for reform

By Drew Nicol  The US state of Colorado has taken centre stage for the first controversy of 2014 by declaring the legalisation of cannabis for recreational use. The decision has followed the new trend of a liberalising of attitudes towards cannabis, which began when Uruguay became the first country to...

Digital trends in 2014

Four ways in which the digital stratosphere will be altered by business in 2014. By Adam Walker 1) Businesses will Continue to Ruin Social Media (particularly YouTube) In a similar way to how Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now stuffed full of advertising, the same destiny is awaiting this year’s...

New year, new jobs market

By Valentina Magri Signs of life are stirring from Britain’s labour market after several years of stagnant growth. That’s the conclusion of the latest CBI-Accenture employment trends survey, conducted between September and October 2013. The respondents - senior executives from firms of all sizes and sectors - reported there is...

What’s right with the left

What’s right with the left, is what’s left of the right, right?   By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter  When I was a child growing up watching political programmes on a Sunday morning (I know, I should have got out more) I believed that Labour and Tory politicians would not...

Why we should teach our Children Mandarin

By Valentina Magri Languages and China European languages are no more rewarding than those from further afield. At least, that’s the opinion of prime minister David Cameron, who said on his return from the trip to China: “By the time the children born today leave school,...

Reflex xenophobia

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic Twenty fourteen has begun with a shameful dose of xenophobia as 'floods' of Romanian and Bulgarian immigrants 'invade' British shores, pillaging our lax benefits system and 'robbing' hard-working Brits of much-needed employment. Scaremongering and sensationalism are commonplace in the dark corners of...

Life in the UK in 2013

By Valentina Magri 'Life is beautiful' is not just the title of a famous Italian comedy-drama, as of 2013, it may be also the statement of the typical English citizen. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently released a report entitled 'How’s Life in 2013', measuring the...

Power struggle in Turkey: Erdogan versus Gulen

By Cagri Cobanoglu – the foreign news editor of Akşam – a national Turkish daily After more than a decade in power, the AK Party of Turkey is facing its biggest crisis yet. After a massive corruption scandal involving sons of three cabinet ministers broke out on 17 December, the...

The times they are a changing

By Drew Nicol 2013 has been a historic year for women’s sport. TV presenter Clare Balding, prophesised back in January that: “When the history of sport is written in 100 years’ time they will look back at 2012 and the Olympics and Paralympics and see the impact in 2013.” –...

Mapping business highways of Britain

By Nathan Lee, Finance and Politics Correspondent Regional economic deficiencies must be solved by business attracting business. Boris Island proposals may have been rejected in the latest Airports Commission report, but London Island remains firmly on the agenda. Above the need for extra airport capacity in the South East, the...

The cape on good pope

By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter  When the smoke turned white from the chimney perched above the Sistine chapel I and many others thought “here we go again”. Another Pope who hates homosexuals, cosies up to the wealthy and ignores sexual abuse claims within catholic clergy. How wrong we were....

To protect or to serve?

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic The British army employs more than 400,000 people to protect our small island, almost two people for every square kilometre in the country. Compared to say, jobseekers’ allowance (£4.91 billion) or housing benefits (£16.9 billion), the cost of fielding our soldiers abroad...

Hanbag Economics: The Ideology of Austerity

By Mary Mellor, Emeritus Professor, Northumbria University George Osborne’s Autumn Statement was a classic espousal of handbag economics, so named after the saint of the handbag, Mrs Thatcher. Handbag economics is the common sense of our age.  Public sectors are like households, they must live within their means, balance their books,...

British schooling has left us speechless

By Drew Nicol Britain’s education system is failing thousands of young people every year by neglecting to emphasise the importance of learning a foreign language, according to the British Council. The British Council’s ‘Languages for the Future’ report conclusively states that “it is a widely held – if not undisputed...

Making an Autumn statement

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent  Follow @adamwalker8715 Last Thursday’s 2013 Autumn Statement heralded a “responsible recovery”. With signs of a brighter economic future in 2013 the chancellor was quick to note that there are still difficult decisions to be made and the UK economy was by no means in the...

Carni-veil of prosperity making Brazil nuts

By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter  Ol’ Blue eyes himself, Frank Sinatra sung the girl from Ipanema about the allure of the fifth-biggest country in the world and its ample assets. Let’s be honest, he was referring to a scantily clad women rather than its bumper soybean crop. Setting aside Frank’s ignorance...

Brazil’s economic tumble

By Nathan Lee, Financial Analyst In 2007 Brazil was awarded the football World Cup with the backdrop of a strengthening economy and the prospect of social change. As it prepares to host the finals, the South American powerhouse lays dormant. There’s a subdued atmosphere surrounding Brazil in the run up...

Cameron and Johnson only see what they want to see

By Pieter Cranenbroek, International Politics Blogger Follow @Pinter_13 Living a sheltered life distorts your view of the world. This is not a scientific fact, just an educated guess based on recent comments by David Cameron and Boris Johnson who seem to be fond of creating their own facts. Despite an abundance...

Born unequal?

By Rachel Wilson, Political Reporter In a rich country such as the UK, there should be certain minimum standards below which no one should fall. In 2010, for the first time ever, the government set itself the target to end childhood poverty for good. Households Below Average Income (HBAI) is...

De-constructing a thriving work environment

by Simon Middleton of Watershed  Bernard Marr, author of Enterprise Performance Expert, recently wrote quite a heated blog outlining why he believes Human Resources departments have had their day. According to Marr, HR departments no longer add value and demean human talent. While his views strongly resonate, there is a...

Can the UK embrace a cycling culture?

By Phil Benton  Follow @paolobento The UK is not a cycling country. Well not yet, at least. In 2012, just two per cent of all journeys were made by bike according to government statistics. In August of this year, David Cameron unveiled ambitious plans to start ‘a cycling revolution’ with the...

Ecommerce; the ticking timebomb

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic Watch Shop is symbolic of how evolutionary pressures on the ecommerce market could manifest themselves in the future. It wasn’t until a recent musing on the London Underground that I realised the potential of specialisation on the web. An advert for Watch...

The Hunger shames

By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter Dangerous immigrants are in this country to sponge from the state, devour royal swans and car jack pensioners.It’s a fact, deal with it.And soon an influx of Bulgarians and Romanians are coming to pester you for change outside your local Pizza Express.But that’s not until...

Waiting for the Great Leap Forward

By Pieter Cranenbroek – International Politics Blogger Music has always been a stage used to criticise the political order, but in the past week Morrissey and Billy Bragg both decided to air their grievances on politics and society off stage. Both singers stressed the problem with the lack of accountability in...

The Throne of Games

By Adam Walker, Economic Correspondent   Is the Video games industry our Christmas Saviour? As the Christmas season begins to move into its busiest period the commercial world’s focus has been firmly fixed on the videogames industry. With a multitude of Triple A game titles being released across 2013 and...

White British; the Madeleine McCann story

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic The Madeleine McCann story offers the most potent example of what makes British media tick and what British people want to read. Although crimes and atrocities occur every day, there are criteria which land them on page nine and conditions which qualify...

Will the revolution be televised?

Behind the scenes with Ben Gelblum TV outside the box Today at 5pm GMT on the eighth floor of a high-rise block in Wembley, broadcasting history will be made. Over the past six months, an enthusiastic crew spearheaded by sports presenter and Green Party spokesman turned anti-establishment maverick David Icke...

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