Linda Marric

Linda Marric

Linda Marric is a freelance film critic and interviewer. She has written extensively about film and TV over the last decade. After graduating with a degree in Film Studies from King's College London, she has worked in post-production on a number of film projects and other film related roles. She has a huge passion for intelligent Scifi movies and is never put off by the prospect of a romantic comedy. Favourite movie: Brazil. Twitter: @Linda_Marric.

The Hustle: Dirty, rotten

The Hustle: Dirty, rotten

★☆☆☆☆ From Overboard (Rob Greenberg, 2018) to What Men Want (Adam Shankman, 2019) and everything else in between, it’s safe to say that gender switch comedy remakes have so far failed to come up with the goods in the laughter department. The latest gender flip comedy, if you can call...

Yesterday: Boyle’s Beatles brilliance

★★★★☆ Nobody can deny that sometimes the simplest of high concept film ideas can be the most ingenious ones. In the case of Danny Boyle’s Yesterday, that idea is so obvious that you can’t help but wonder, why has nobody thought of it until now? Written by the indisputable king...

Little: As in not much

Little: As in not much

★★☆☆☆ In Little, director Tina Gordon presents a deeply contrived, narratively flawed and criminally mirthless high concept comedy about a female tech boss who is transformed into her younger self when the pressures of being an adult become too much to handle. Starring Regina Hall, Issa Rae and Marsai Martin...

Film Review: The Girl In The Spider’s Web

Film Review: The Girl In The Spider’s Web

The first Lisbeth Salander story not to be penned by acclaimed nordic noir writer Stieg Larsson sees the return of the infamous kick-ass vigilante hacker in a film that sadly fails to measure up to its predecessors on almost every front. Directed by Fede Alvarez (Evil Dead) and adapted from David Lagercrantz’s 2015 novel of...

Film Review: Fantastic Beasts – The Crimes of Grindelwald

Film Review: Fantastic Beasts – The Crimes of Grindelwald

The second instalment in J.K. Rowling’s five part Fantastic Beasts story sees director David Yates at the helm once again, in this well acted if ultimately lacklustre sequel to its critically acclaimed 2016 predecessor, which saw a welcome return to the magical Harry Potter universe. Set a year on from its predecessor, The Crimes Of Grindelwald opens...

Film Review: Juliet, Naked

In Juliet, Naked director Jesse Peretz (Nurse Jackie, GLOW) offers a disarmingly compelling romantic comedy, which despite its decidedly contrived and uneven narrative still manages to deliver a hearteningly charming storyline about second chances in life, in this surprisingly enjoyable adaptation of Nick Hornby’s 2009 best selling novel of the same name. Annie (Rose Byrne) is...

Film Review: Bad Times At The El Royale

Drew Goddard’s Bad Times At The El Royale is a gripping Tarantinoesque Nixon era crime caper in which seven strangers find themselves battling it out through a stormy night at a dilapidated, and tastelessly decorated hotel which straddles the California and Nevada border. Written by Goddard himself, the film presents...

Film Review: Venom

In Venom, Sony’s latest Marvel offering, director Ruben Fleischer and his writing team seem to have completely failed to grasp the fact that the world has moved on from the old superhero tropes of two-dimensional characters and half-baked ideas that relied too often on a lazy premise and even lazier dialogue. This...

Film Review: The Wife

In Björn Runge’s The Wife, Glenn Close offers a truly outstanding performance as the long suffering wife of an insufferably vain novelist (played by Jonathan Pryce). Adapted for the screen by Jane Anderson from Meg Wolitzer’s 2003 novel of the same name, the film is a beautifully understated, thought provoking and deeply affecting study in...

Film Review: A Simple Favor

In A Simple Favor, director Paul Feig offers a riotously funny, stylish and beautifully well observed Gone Girl-esque mystery thriller which somehow manages to be funnier and far more engaging than it has any right to be. Adapted by Jessica Sharzer form Darcey Bell's 2017 novel of the same name, the film mixes brilliantly acerbic one-liners...

Film Review: The Nun

Directed by Corin Hardy, the new instalment in what is now being referred to as the “Conjuring Universe" is a rather stale and scare-free affair that’s only just slightly rescued by its female lead’s incredible screen presence, and remarkable performance. Written by Gary Dauberman (It, Annabelle) from a story by James Wan, The Nun offers more of...

Film Review: The Equalizer 2

In 2014, Antoine Fuqua’s screen adaptation of the popular 1980s series The Equalizer took the box office by storm and went on to break more records by making almost 4 times more than it cost to make, not least thanks to the star power of its lead actor and all...

Film Review: Christopher Robin

In Christopher Robin, director Marc Forster presents a nostalgia-laden adaptation of A.A Milne’s cherished children’s classic, in a film that is as heartwarming in its intent, as it is a little lacklustre in its delivery. Starring Ewan McGregor as the titular character, the film introduces a clever twist on the...

Film Review: Skyscraper

Film Review: Skyscraper

Let’s face it, nobody has ever gone into a Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson action movie expecting a coherent plot or even a believable storyline, and to be frank this hasn’t stopped the actor from becoming one of the most bankable actions stars of the last decade. In the case of...

Film Review: Swimming With Men

Film Review: Swimming With Men

Marketed, rather predictably, as the next Full Monty (yes another one), Oliver Parker’s Swimming With Men is a charming, if utterly forgettable comedy that follows the adventures of an all-male synchronised swimming team of varying ages and backgrounds as they navigate their respective difficulties in life, albeit via the medium...

EIFF ‘18 First Look Review: The Parting Glass

EIFF ‘18 First Look Review: The Parting Glass

In his debut feature as director, actor Stephen Moyer (True Blood, The Double) offers a decently put together and beautifully acted family drama which seems to tick all the right boxes thematically, but sadly fails to completely convince due to its overwrought and slightly-too-meandering screenplay. Written by actor turned screenwriter...

Film Review: Freak Show

Film Review: In The Fade

Fatih Akin’s new German drama about a woman hellbent on seeking revenge after the murder of her family is a rather contrived, facile and at times overly melodramatic production that could have easily benefited from losing some schmaltz in favour of a more nuanced narrative. Staring Diane Kruger and co-written...

Film Review: Hereditary

Film Review: Hereditary

With the success in 2017 of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning, post-race horror Get Out, or more recently John Krasinski’s spine-chilling sci-fi hit A Quiet Place, it would be far too simplistic to speak of a sudden horror resurgence, especially when one considers that beyond the hype created around a few Hollywood-backed productions,...

Film Review: L’Amant Double

Film Review: L’Amant Double

In his latest feature film L’Amant Double, prolific French director Francois Ozon offers a fantastically bonkers premise that’s likely to bewilder and enchant audiences in equal measures. Playing with classical thriller tropes, and with a heavy dose of Gallic eroticism added for good measure, the film owes more to Hitchcock...

Film Review: Book Club

Film Review: Book Club

It would be far too easy to sneer, mock and feel a little exasperated by its saccharine sweet narrative, but Bill Holderman's new romantic comedy Book Club remains one of the most groundbreaking films of its genre, regardless of how contrived or predictable it might seem to some. Staring Jane...

Film Review: The Breadwinner

Film Review: The Breadwinner

Perhaps one of the most inspiring things about Nora Twomey's Oscar nominated first feature animation The Breadwinner is how female it is in it all its aspects. Adapted from Canadian writer Deborah Ellis’s best selling Young Adult novel of the same name, and executive produced by Angelina Jolie, the film...

Film Review: Deadpool 2

Film Review: Deadpool 2

With Avengers: Infinity War still breaking box office records around the world, one could be forgiven for wanting a little respite from big epic superhero productions, even if it is from one which purports to pastiche and subvert this very genre. However, whether we like it or not, Deadpool 2...

Film Review: Entebbe

Film Review: Entebbe

In the summer of 1976, two members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, aided by 2 members of the West German Revolutionary Cells group, hijacked an Air France flight heading from Tel Aviv to Paris and took its 250 passengers hostages. The group then forced the plane’s...

Film Review: Anon

Film Review: Anon

Fans of Andrew Niccol will be all too than familiar with the director’s particular brand of Philip K Dick inspired output. From the timeless cult classic Gattaca which is set in a future where people are judged on the strength of their genetic make-up rather than on merit, to the...

Film Review: Rampage

Film Review: Rampage

Loosely based on the video game series of the same name and staring the force of nature that is the mighty Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Rampage had all the makings of yet another meat-headed, big, brash and silly disaster movie, so it was a genuine surprise to find out just...

Film Review: Love, Simon

Film Review: Love, Simon

While LGBTQ stories have found their rightful place within the safety of indie cinema for a while now — the success of Call Me By Your Name this year, and Moonlight in 2017 can attest to this — the same cannot be said about the visibility of non-stereotypical gay characters...

Film Review: A Quiet Place

Film Review: A Quiet Place

In A Quiet Place, actor turned director John Krasinski (The Office, Detroit) transports us into a hellish post-apocalyptic world in which silence has become humanity’s only chance of survival. Written by Krasinski, who also stars alongside Emily Blunt (who is married to Krasinski in real life), the film is a...

Film Review: Unsane

Film Review: Unsane

Shot on an iPhone7 Plus, and costing just over $1 million to make, Steven Soderbergh’s latest feature film Unsane is a ballsy & brave foray into thriller territory from a director who has never been afraid of pushing the boundaries, and making do with what is available to him in...

Film Review: Pacific Rim – Uprising

Fans of watching big robots and Kaiju-style monsters hitting each other repeatedly, destroying everything around them for good measure, rejoice! Everyone else, you might want to sit this one out, because if you were expecting anything resembling a coherent story from the follow up to Guillermo del Toro's 2013 blockbuster...

Film Review: Wonder Wheel

Film Review: Wonder Wheel

At the age of 82, Woody Allen is still showing no signs of slowing down. Year after year, the legendary director keeps on coming up with the good and remains unperturbed by the controversies surrounding him, and year after year hordes of young and not so young actors still line...

Film Review: You Were Never Really Here

Film Review: You Were Never Really Here

After a frustratingly long period of absence, Lynne Ramsey (We Need To Talk About Kevin, 2011) is back with an equally gut-wrenching tale of crime and retribution which is set to thrill the Scottish director’s growing army fans. Based on Jonathan Ames’ novel of the same name, You Were Never...

Film Review: I, Tonya

Film Review: I, Tonya

It is a testament to Margot Robbie’s impressive acting talent that from the moment you set eyes on her in I, Tonya, that you instantly know that you are in a pair safe hands. Directed by Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl, United States of Tara) the film recounts...

Film Review: Den Of Thieves

Film Review: Den Of Thieves

Directed by London Has Fallen writer Christian Gudegas and staring Gerard Butler, Den Of Thieves is the sort of testosterone laden action flick that doesn’t seem to care much about offering anything resembling a coherent storyline, opting instead for a lazily constructed and needlessly meandering narrative, which in the end...

Film Review: The Post

Film Review: The Post

As Steven Spielberg’s latest feature film, The Post, makes its way onto our screens this week, the parallels that can be drawn between the story it tells and the current political landscape won’t be lost on anyone. Centring around the events which led to a war between the Nixon administration...