Festival Coverage

Cannes 2019 Review: Matthias & Maxime

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Xavier Dolan is known as a child of Cannes. He is feted at the world’s leading film festival like few directors have ever known. 2014’s Mommy earned him the Jury Prize (which he shared with Jean-Luc Godard) and It’s Only the End of the World picked up 2016’s Grand Prix, from George Miller’s controversial jury, despite it being savaged by critics on the Croisette. His follow-up, The Life and Death of John F. Donovan, which...

Cannes 2019 Review:Parasite

★★★★☆ Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho) is long-term unemployed and festering at home. He makes a bit of money folding pizza boxes for a local restaurant, helped by his two teenaged kids and wife, but their living conditions are dire and the future looks decidedly bleak. Rough and uncouth this family might be, but when Ki-taek’s son, Ki-woo (Woo Shik Choi) lands a well-paid gig, fraudulently posing as a qualified English tutor to a high school girl from a posh family, things...

Cannes 2019 Review: The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao

★★★★★ Two young women – sisters – are walking in a woodland. One loses track of the other. She calls out, hoping to find her. Karim Aïnouz’s Brazilian melodrama begins with a mood of ill-ease beautifully complemented by high-contrast, soft focus, 16mm cinematography, lending the opening scene a dreamlike sense of portent or bad omen. If your Spidey senses are tingling, in this regard, they’re accurate enough. Set in 1950s Rio de Janeiro, Euridice (Carol Duarte) and Guida (Julia Stockler)...

Cannes 2019 Review: Beanpole

★★★★☆ Kantemir Balagov returns to Festival de Cannes’ Un Certain Regard programme for a second time with Beanpole (2019), a haunting post-WW2 drama where two former soldiers who served on the front in a female combat unit are reunited. The young cineaste portrays, with deft skill, themes of submission and domination, repressed desires and manipulative tendencies underpinning acts of friendship. It’s 1946 and Mother Russia is getting back on her feet, after years fighting the Nazis. At a hospital in...

London Film Festival 2018: Wrap Up

Over the last month I've been covering the London Film Festival for TLE, trying largely to bring you a taste of the slightly more esoteric side of the festival. The time, sadly, has come to wrap up our coverage for this year, but there's one last thing to do: our wrap up show. In the near future we'll have a regular podcast coming from TLE, but until then here's a special instalment with myself and Alfie Parsons of Lights Camera...

London Film Festival 2018: Cam

What we mean by horror is something that expands and evolves over the years. This is perhaps especially true of tech horror. From the possibilities of electricity being harnessed to horrific and tragic ends in Frankenstein, to the modern slew of desktop thrillers, horror writers and filmmakers have always harnessed new tech for new scares. Cam, written by Isa Mazzei (who herself used to work as a camgirl) introduces us to Alice (Madeline Brewer), who does cam shows as Lola...

London Film Festival 2018: I Used To Be Normal: A Boyband Fangirl Story

“Did you?” asked the woman at the box office as I asked for my ticket for I Used to be Normal. I considered lying, but decided against it. “Not really”. I’ve been an obsessive fan of movies since I was 8 years old but, while some of the kinds of films I love best are (especially as a 37-year-old man) not exactly considered cool, I’ve never felt judged or that I should hide my enthusiasms. That seems to be one...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Angelo

It didn’t surprise anyone who saw his first film, Michael, to discover that director Markus Schleinzer used to work with Michael Haneke. Disquietingly still and at times striking, it was a debut that felt too in thrall to another filmmaker to be more than promising. Angelo, while sharing may of the same stylistic choices, is a more distinctive work. The Angelo of the title is the ‘court moor’ to several families in Viennese society in the 18th century, and the...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Dragged Across Concrete

With his first two films, writer/director S. Craig Zahler established a distinctive voice. Working in exploitation cinema but unbound by the genre’s usual brief running times, he has stretched out his narratives, using the extra running time to dive more deeply into his characters than is typical in exploitation and to play with the genre. In Bone Tomahawk he morphed The Searchers into Cannibal Holocaust, with Brawl in Cell Block 99 he spent a good deal of time building both...

Page 2 of 5 1 2 3 5