Who wants to be an European? We do

By Valentina Magri European elections are coming and fear is growing. The terror is called UKIP (UK Independence Party). The party who wants Britain exit from the EU and tougher immigration laws may gain 25-35 per cent of votes, according to the latest polls, pushing PM Cameron’s Conservatives in third place. But the situation is not as tough as it seems for the EU. This is the conclusion of a recent survey by the PewResearchCenter, conducted from March 17 to...

Life after Death in North Korea

By Ashley Etchells-Butler A fundamental problem I have with any religious organisation is that it not only asks for complete obedience throughout this life, but for eternity after you die. If you are good, you go to a nice place. But if you are bad you are likely to suffer unimaginable torture – forever But at least this manner of spiritual exploitation is essentially speculative on the part of the parties involved. The blood-cult of North Korea employs a rather...

It’s still about the economy, stupid

By Andy Irwin On their own, opinion polls offer little more than a fleeting glimpse of a point in time, a snapshot of the immediate thinking of a sample of the electorate – they are dated before the ink is dry. Different polls have their own biases depending on the sampling methods they use and, dare I say, the association of particular media outlets or individuals associated with the polls. These differences are often slight, and looking at a number...

The Blame-Game, Double Standards & Fast Food: A Tale of the United States Economy

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent The end of April saw the proposed federal minimum wage increase to $10.10 per hour defeated by a Republican-led filibuster in the United States’ Senate, all because it is claimed not to be the job of the federal government to decide salaries. The vote, however, wasn’t about giving millions of working Americans a pay raise but rather to decide if the Senate should merely discuss whether they deserve one. Democrats and Republicans live for divisive, partisan...

The Horror of Fracking and Why We Can’t Regulate it – A Warning!!

By J T Coombes www.globalmagnacarta.com @GMagnaCarta The problem is all in the title. Fracking is all about ‘hydraulic fracturing’ to give it its full title. Simply put it’s a procedure that creates fractures in rocks and their formations deep under the earth, by injecting sand water and chemicals into cracks to force them to open further. This allows more oil and gas to come out of the rock formation where it can be extracted. In essence it is putting underground...

Please don’t read too much into the Opinion Polls

By Gregory Taylor Election time is almost upon us once again, and with the election comes the endless opinion polls. Of course reading an opinion poll is good idea to work out what’s going on in the country and it gives the parties an idea of how well things are going, but people should not read too much into them. Often you hear people talk about how UKIP is polling very high and the decline in support for the Lib...

The Sectarianisation of Public Spaces

By Marcus Hunt On the 12th of July 2013, for the first time, the Ligoniel Combine of the Orange Order was prevented from completing its return march past the Ardoyne area. The decision was made by the controversial Parades Commission, a quasi-judicial body established in 1998.  Since July the Ligoniel Combine has attempted to march along the disputed street on dozens of occasions, and continues to do so, but each time is prevented by a police line. The reason the...

Is ‘the pint’ surplus to requirement?

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic  A pint glass is an excessive, unduly measure. Have you ever drunk a pint and thought, “I really enjoyed that last drop”? The so-called ‘dregs’ is defined both as the remnants of a liquid left in a container and the most worthless part or parts of something, which is fitting. I’ve seldom reached that part of the pint where you tip your head and see the glaze of the pub through the...

The Rise of Britain’s Food Banks

By Alex Murtagh As we find ourselves four years into David Cameron’s premiership with no sign of a coalition collapse it appears that the government’s neglect of the poor is seriously beginning to take its toll. Reports published by the Trussell Trust just last week show that the use of food banks has risen by 163 per cent in the last year alone with no sign of a halt. But how have we allowed this absurd scenario to develop? I fear...

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