Wyndham Hacket Pain

Wyndham Hacket Pain

Wyndham is a freelance film critic and former Editor-in-Chief of Pi Magazine. He has previously been involved in film festival curation and independent short films.

Film Review: Vice

Vice opens not in an office of government but with the sight of a young Dick Cheney being called over by the police for drink driving. Having already dropped out of Yale, he spent most of his early twenties drinking and working as an electricity maintenance worker. Fearful that his...

Film Review: Beautiful Boy

Beautiful Boy is an affecting drama about a father coping with his son’s drug addiction that is equally intriguing as it is frustrating. It stars Steve Carrell as David Sheff, a successful journalist living in rural California. His son Nic (Timothée Chalamet) is a seemingly normal teenager who is getting ready to go to university but...

The London Economic

Film Review: Stan and Ollie

Stan Laurel and Ollie Hardy had been performing together for almost 30 years when they arrived in the UK in 1954 for a theatre tour. Their glory days were clearly behind them but they put on a string of admirable performances despite their advanced years and failing health. They may...

Film Review: The Old Man & The Gun

Adapted from The New Yorker article of the same name, The Old Man & the Gun tells the mostly true story of a serial bank robber who even in his 70s couldn’t resist the thrill of his next heist. Following a miraculous escape from San Quentin prison, Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford) begins a string...

Film Review: The Workshop

A decade after winning the Palme d’Or for his film The Class, director Laurent Cantet brings us apolitically engaged look at France’s disenfranchised youth. Set in the coastal town of La Ciotat – the place where the Lumière brothers filmed a moving train and invented cinema – The Workshop centres around a summer writing class. It is led...

Film Review: Peterloo

The Peterloo Massacre may be a strangely overlooked event within British history, but there is something undeniably timely about the episode and Mike Leigh’s adaptation of it. Peterloo charts the period between the Battle of Waterloo and the Peterloo Massacre that took place in Manchester four years later. On 16th August 1819, an estimated 60,000 people gathered in St Peter’s Field, Manchester...

Film Review: Halloween

The Halloween franchise has taken many forms since the first film was released in 1978. In the subsequent years there have been no fewer than seven sequels, two reboots, several novels, and a series of comics. Rather than tangling itself in the franchise’s messy back catalogue, director David Gordon Green pretends that...

Film Review: Columbus

In real life Columbus, Indiana is a rather unassuming small city located in the American heart land. With a population of around 50,000 people it would be easy to overlook Columbus in favour of the larger and more recognisable cities that can be found not too far away. Academic turned filmmaker Kogonada’s debut film...

Film Review: Faces Places

Faces Places has a brilliantly simple premise. The film follows photographer JR and legendary film director Agnès Varda as they travel to small French towns and photograph the people they find there. The photos they take are in turn used to create large murals which are plastered onto nearby buildings. Through doing this JR and Varda speak to...

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