Wyndham Hacket Pain

Wyndham Hacket Pain

Wyndham is a freelance film critic and former Editor-in-Chief of Pi Magazine. He has previously been involved in film festival curation and independent short films.

Film Review: Phantom Thread

A decade on from their first collaboration, director Paul Thomas Anderson and actor Daniel Day-Lewis reunite for another tale driven by strong personalities, power struggles, and personal obsession. Set in 1950s London, Phantom Thread follows Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), a fashion designer who makes clothes for high society and even...

Film Review: Early Man

If you have ever wondered what Wallace & Gromit’s ancestors would have looked like then the latest feature from the much loved Aardman Animation Studio will have you catered for. Set on prehistoric earth, somewhere near Manchester, Early Man follows a rabbit hunting tribe and its inquisitive and likable member...

Film Review: The Commuter

The Commuter is the latest in an increasingly long line of action films to have starred Liam Neeson. This time around he plays Michael MaCauley, a proud family man and insurance salesman, who takes the same train to and from work every day. On the train home one day a...

Film Review: Darkest Hour

Where Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk looked at the British Army’s retreat from the European mainland almost exclusively from the perspective of the service men involved, Joe Wright’s Darkest Hour looks at the same events from the perspective of politicians behind it. Opening with Neville Chamberlain’s (Ronald Pickup) resignation as Prime Minister,...

Film Review: All The Money In The World

Oil tycoon J. Paul Getty was the richest man in the world when his grandson was kidnapped on the streets of Rome in 1973. It is an intriguing episode that serves as inspiration for Ridley Scott’s latest feature, All the Money in the World. The film begins with the kidnapping...

Film Review: Jupiter’s Moon

Perhaps unsurprisingly, refugees and migration have been popular topics with filmmakers in recent years. Indeed, over the last 12 months there have been a number of excellent projects, notably The Other Side of Hope and Human Flow, which have reflected upon the struggles and experiences of migrant travellers. With Jupiter’s...

Film Review: Molly’s Game

Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin has never been particularly interested in fact or historical accuracy, and even though he often builds stories around real life figures, they frequently have little in common with those at the heart of the source material. He has previously turned Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg from a goofy...

Why I Watch The Apartment Every Christmas

For all the joy and frivolity of the festive period, film has always had a tendency to show the darker side of the holiday. From Dead of Night and Mon Oncle Antoine, to the mournful Meet Me in St. Louis and emotionally raw It’s a Wonderful Life, Christmas at the...

Film Review: Menashe

When you think of Brooklyn, images of trendy shops and fashionably dressed residents probably come to mind. Something akin to Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha or While We’re Young. Yet, in the same area there are groups of people living very different lifestyles. The Orthodox Jewish community depicted in Menashe may...

Film Review: Lu Over the Wall

It has always taken something special for Japanese animations to register with a global audience. Over the years, films like Akira, Ghost in the Shell, and Spirited Away have captured viewer’s hearts across the world. But even though a large number of animes get produced each year, only a couple...

Film Review: Beach Rats

Set in provincial Brooklyn during the last days of summer, Beach Rats follows Frankie (Harris Dickinson), a 19-year-old who spends most of his time fooling around with his posse of friends and his girlfriend Simone (Madeline Weinstein). He lives at home with his mother (Kate Hodge), younger sister, and bed...

Film Review: Suburbicon

Suburbicon is set in 1957 within a suburban town of the same name. It is the kind of small American town that is synonymous with the work of Douglas Sirk and films like All That Heaven Allows and Written on the Wind, but it is a setting that has remained...

Film Review: GOOD TIME

We have all at one point or other seen our well made plans go awry but I’m sure they do not compare with the one at the centre of Good Time. Set in Queens, New York, the film opens with Nick Nikas (Ben Safdie) having a learning disability test. Before...

Film Review: Professor Marston and The Wonder Women

With the recent success of Wonder Woman still fresh in our minds, director Angela Robinson brings us the real life story behind 2017’s most memorable superhero. Professor Marston and the Wonder Women is told in flashbacks and switches between scenes where William Marston (Luke Evans) is having to justify the Wonder Woman comics he created to...

Film Review: Sorcerer

Seen by many to be William Friedkin’s overlooked masterpiece, Sorcerer was a box office flop and was met with rather mixed reviews upon its original release. After the budget ballooned to around £22 million, the film struggled to recoup half that at the box office. The critical response wasn’t much better with...

Film Review: 78/52

Taking seven days to shoot and incorporating 78 camera setups and 52 cuts, the shower scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is one of the most memorable and iconic sequences in cinematic history. In 78/52 director Alexandre O. Philippe looks behind the curtain of Hitchcock’s most famous murder. Joining him is an impressive ensemble of...

Brawl in Cell Block 99 – Review

It is fair to say that Brawl in Cell Block 99 delivers on its title. It’s the kind of film that makes you feel like a bad person for liking it. Set in the Sothern states of the USA, the film opens with Bradley Thomas (Vince Vaughn) losing his job...

Film Review: Dina

Winner of this year’s Documentary Grand Jury Prize at Sundance, Dina follows its title character as she prepares to get married to her fiancé Scott, who works as a greeter at Walmart. They are both on the autism spectrum and each struggle with it in different ways. For the most...

Film Review: I Am Not a Witch

Many of us, including myself, have visited tribal villages while on holiday to an African country. It is a fairly normal activity and the kind of display that opens I Am Not a Witch. So called witches are penned within a primitive Zambian settlement and are tied to ribbons to...

Film Review: The Snowman

On the surface The Snowman looks like one of those films that could only be good. With an acclaimed director, a strong cast, interesting source material, and even Martin Scorsese in an executive producer role, what could possibly go wrong? Based on the novel by Jo Nesbø of the same...

Film Review: The Ritual

From the outset it is clear that The Ritual has ambitions to be more than just another tired and predictable horror film. Following the death of their friend Robert (Paul Reid), a group of university friends, now in their early thirties, forgo the traditional boys holiday and instead go on...

Film Review: Loving Vincent

Films about enigmatic real life characters often go to large efforts to find and discover their chosen figure. In Loving Vincent this search is a bit more literal. Vincent van Gogh (Robert Gulaczyk) was an ardent letter writer during his life and after his death Joseph Roulin (Chris O’Dowd), a...

Film Review: The Night is Short, Walk on Girl

Based on Tomihiko Morimi’s bestselling novel of the same name, The Night is Short, Walk on Girl takes place over a single eventful night and follows Otome as she parties, gets drunk for the first time, visits a book fair, and takes part in a university festival. All the while...

Film Review: Blade Runner: The Final Cut

With its highly anticipated sequel set for release in the next couple of weeks there is no better time to see the original that lies at the heart of all the excitement. To coincide with this, as well as the 35th anniversary of its initial release, Blade Runner has been...

Film Review: On Body and Soul

Filmmakers have always enjoyed bringing us unlikely love stories. Whether it is Annie Hall, Harold and Maude, Her, or even Beauty and the Beast there are plenty of films that have shown how love can blossom in the most challenging of environments and circumstances. With On Body and Soul, the...

Film Review: Victoria & Abdul

Set in the latter years of Queen Victoria’s (Judi Dench) reign, Victoria & Abdul tells the story of her unexpected friendship with an Indian servant. Originally only meant to participate in the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, Abdul (Ali Fazal) quickly becomes a devoted servant and friend of the monarch. The extended...

Film Review: Stratton

Based on Duncan Falconer’s book The Hostage, Stratton follows John Stratton (Dominic Cooper), a Special Boat Service operative, who along with a secret services team is trying to intercept a batch of deadly biochemical weapons. The weapons find their way into the hands of former Soviet operative Grigory Barovsky (Thomas...

Film Review: The Limehouse Golem

The streets of Victorian East London must have been a pretty scary place. Before the trendy bars and artisan coffee shops, it was full of dark alleyways, smoky air, questionable characters, and of course murder. It is the latter that The Limehouse Golem is concerned with. Set in Victorian London,...

American Made: Film Review

On the surface American Made could look like Tom Cruise having a midlife crisis on screen. The flashy action sequences, topless shots showing off hours spent at the gym, and the kind of fast planes that made him famous could all be interpreted as an attempt to recapture the spirit...

Detroit: Film Review

Set in 1967, Detroit opens with a police raid on an unlicensed club where the return of black veterans from Vietnam is being celebrated. Suspects are brought out onto the street and a mob forms around them. As the suspects are arrested the mob starts to through rocks at the...

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