Sam Inglis

Sam Inglis

Sam Inglis has been writing about movies for 20 years. His interests include coming of age movies, horror and exploitation cinema and literally anything featuring Jennifer Jason Leigh. He tweets at @24FPSUK, and blogs at 24fps.org.uk. He also thinks writing about himself in the third person is weird.

BANNED! Visions of Ecstasy

BANNED! Visions of Ecstasy

In this ongoing series, Sam Inglis casts a retrospective look on films that were banned from exhibition by the British censor. Usually, for a series like this, there is a limited set of issues to cover. Films are generally supressed, cut or outright banned for reasons of sex, violence or...

Now on Netflix: See You Yesterday and RBG

Now on Netflix: See You Yesterday and RBG

See You Yesterday ★★★★☆ In the last year or so we have seen several films that suggest the impact of the Black Lives Matter movement on cinema. See You Yesterday is something of a departure in that rather than sticking to a realistic setting it folds its message into a...

John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum. Number 3 with fewer bullets.

John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum. Number 3 with fewer bullets.

★★★★☆ The John Wick series is one of simple pleasures. From relatively humble beginnings as a sleeper hit on a sub $30m budget, the series has grown in both scope and success, while still largely recognising where its core strengths lie. Chapter 3 picks up with Keanu Reeves’ John Wick...

Pokemon: Detective Pikachu fails to spark

Pokemon: Detective Pikachu fails to spark

★☆☆☆☆ Pokemon is a genuine cultural phenomenon. It’s a franchise over 20 years old spanning across card and console games, TV shows, animated movies and other merchandise, grossing north of $90bn. I have never played or watched any of it before. I am certain that for fans who have followed...

Long Shot: Hits most targets, misses a bullseye

Long Shot: Hits most targets, misses a bullseye

★★★☆☆ Charlotte Field (Charlize Theron) is the youngest US Secretary of State in history and is preparing for a Presidential run, while her numbers are positive, she needs to up her humour score and so she’s looking for a joke writer to pump up her speeches. Fred Flarsky (Seth Rogen)...

Avengers Endgame: Spoiler free review

Avengers Endgame: Spoiler free review

★★★☆☆ We left the Avengers in a cloud of dust that used to be their friends and fellow heroes, snapped out of existence along with half the living creatures in the universe. We meet them again a few weeks later, attempting to pick up the pieces, to try once more...

Roundup Reviews: Greta and Red Joan

Roundup Reviews: Greta and Red Joan

Greta ★★★☆☆ Dir: Neil Jordan When Frances McCullen (Chloe Grace Moretz) returns a handbag she found on the subway, she becomes friends with a lonely older woman named Greta (Isabelle Huppert). When she discovers some disturbing things about Greta and tries to cut off contact, Frances finds that her new...

Hellboy: And to Hell he can go

Hellboy: And to Hell he can go

★☆☆☆☆ It’s probably best to establish, right up front, my engagement with Mike Mignola’s character, Hellboy. I never read the comics, so my only knowledge of the character comes from the two films made by Guillermo Del Toro in 2004 and 2008. I understand that Mignola was happy with them,...

Wild Rose: She can do anything

Wild Rose: She can do anything

Glaswegian Rose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley) has just got out of prison after a 12 month sentence. Returning home, she’s greeted by her mother Marion (Julie Walters), who has been looking after her two young kids. She takes a job as a cleaner, but all Rose-Lynn really wants is to go...

The Week in Movies: March 25th-31st 2019

The Week in Movies: March 25th-31st 2019

Braid ★★★★★ Dir: Mitzi Peirone Petula and Tilda (Imogen Waterhouse and Sarah Hay), on the run from the law and saddled with a debt to their dealer, decide to rob an old friend, Daphne (Madeline Brewer). To do so they must fall back into the roles they played in childhood...

The Week in Movies: February 18th – 24th 2019

The Week in Movies: February 18th – 24th 2019

Happy Death Day 2 UDir: Christopher LandonIt would take only two words to sum up the concept of the first Happy Death Day: “Groundhog Slay”. Taking the time looping concept of the classic Bill Murray comedy and applying it to a homage to post Scream comedy inflected 90s slashers, the...

The Complete… Nils Malmros: Part 1

The Complete… Nils Malmros: Part 1

This series will attempt to look at the complete careers of directors, actors and other filmmakers. In looking at these filmographies, we will see the context in which they fit together, into an arc of a career and into the life of the subject. I knew I didn’t want to begin...

The Week in Movies: January 7th – 13th 2019

The Week in Movies: January 7th – 13th 2019

KinDir: Josh and Jonathan BakerI talk about the way films are marketed, or rather mis-marketed, a lot. Outside the cinemas, UK distribution is awash with films you might never notice have been released. Some you might have heard of, except they got released with new titles. Others, like Kin, have...

BANNED! AXE [1974]

BANNED! AXE [1974]

The video nasties list isn’t jam packed with classics (though it features a fair few), but what it is, by accident rather than design, is a list of truly singular films. For better or worse, almost every film on the nasties list is an original, something born of passionate people...

Film Review: Colette

Film Review: Colette

A long cherished project for director Wash Westmoreland and his late husband and writing partner Richard Glatzer, Colette has been over fifteen years in the planning. It’s a bit disappointing, then, to find that it’s a fairly straightforward telling of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette’s (Keira Knightley) life during her marriage to Henry...

The Week in Movies: December 31st 2018 – January 6th 2019

The Week in Movies: December 31st 2018 – January 6th 2019

ShirkersDir: Sandi TanMany films are lost, but I’m not sure I’ve ever previously heard of a film being stolen. Shirkers is a film about a film, one made in 1989 by a group of film students, written by 18 year old Sandi Tan and directed by Georges Cardona, who taught...

Film Review: Bumblebee

Film Review: Bumblebee

I had the toys when I was growing up, but oddly I don’t have any specific memory of the Transformers TV show, the same goes for the animated film that so many fans hold close to their hearts. That being the case, when I saw Michael Bay’s first live action...

Podcast: Film Review of the Year 2018

In this special end of year wrap up, Film Features Editor Sam Inglis and Film Editor James McAllister take a look at 2018 in film. What kind of year has it been? What were the best and worst films? (A clue, there's one of each in the image above). What...

Film Review: Nancy

For some years now, I have been a frustrated fan of the British actress Andrea Riseborough. She’s clearly a huge talent, but one who always seemed to turn up and be the best thing in movies that were anything from disaster (Madonna’s misbegotten W/E, in which she shone against all...

The Week in Movies: November 19th – 25th 2018

Just a couple of reviews this week, both from my catch up on 2018 titles. Megan Leavey In this fact based drama, Kate Mara plays Megan Leavey, who, at 20, joins the Marines out of a sense that her life isn’t going anywhere. She ends up training as a...

The Week in Movies: November 12th – 18th 2018

The Nutcracker and the Four RealmsDisney’s latest would be blockbuster isn’t another live action remake of one of its animated classics. That’s not to say it’s particularly good though. This version of the fairytale perennial is based both on the story by ETA Hoffmann and the ballet by Tchaikovsky. It...

Film Review: I Think We’re Alone Now

Del (Peter Dinklage) is pretty sure he’s the last man on Earth. When we meet him there has been an unspecified catastrophe, in which it seems everyone simply collapsed and died. Del, alone, works his way around his nameless town, going house to house, cleaning up and burying the bodies...

Film Review: Suspiria [1977]

Note: This is a slightly rewritten version of a review from a screening at the London Film Festival 2017, published here to tie in with my review of Luca Guadagnino’s remake. While he continues to dilute his legacy with garbage like Giallo and Dracula 3D (and the rest of the...

Film Review: Suspiria [2018]

It’s important for a critic to understand and to state their bias, so I should say upfront that I love the original 1977 version of Suspiria. Dario Argento’s hallucinatory masterpiece is one of the most beautiful horror films ever made, and to my mind one of the greatest. This only...

The Week in Movies: November 5th – 11th 2018

The Hate U GiveFilm is a reactive medium, but because it is expensive and time consuming to make it’s also often a slow one. The Black Lives Matter movement began in 2013 but this year we seem to have seen a glut of films that feel like they are responding...

Film Review: Mirai

I’m not fond of the tendency to label any interesting new anime director as ‘the next Miyazaki’. Partly this is because I’m a far bigger fan of the Studio Ghibli films by other directors but it also just strikes me as an easy crutch, and to apply it to filmmakers...

The Week in Movies: October 29th – November 4th 2018

Welcomes to a new series on TLE Film. Here, each week, our film writers will have free rein to spotlight a few of the films they've seen recently in capsule reviews. The films could be from this week, they could be from the silent era. Hopefully our week in movies...

24 Hours of Terror

It’s Halloween soon, so a lot of movie lovers are planning horror marathons for the season. I’ve clearly gone mad, so I figured I would try to suggest the longest endurance test of them all: a 24 hour horrorthon. I’m five minutes short, but hopefully you’ll forgive that. Obviously I’d...

London Film Festival 2018: Wrap Up

Over the last month I've been covering the London Film Festival for TLE, trying largely to bring you a taste of the slightly more esoteric side of the festival. The time, sadly, has come to wrap up our coverage for this year, but there's one last thing to do: our...

London Film Festival 2018: Cam

What we mean by horror is something that expands and evolves over the years. This is perhaps especially true of tech horror. From the possibilities of electricity being harnessed to horrific and tragic ends in Frankenstein, to the modern slew of desktop thrillers, horror writers and filmmakers have always harnessed...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Angelo

It didn’t surprise anyone who saw his first film, Michael, to discover that director Markus Schleinzer used to work with Michael Haneke. Disquietingly still and at times striking, it was a debut that felt too in thrall to another filmmaker to be more than promising. Angelo, while sharing may of...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Rafiki

I have a longstanding policy at the London Film Festival of trying to discover films from new places, so whenever the chance comes to see something from a country whose cinema is entirely new to me, I try to take it. I believe this is my first Kenyan film, but...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review U – July 22

“You’ll never understand, just listen to me” says Kaja (Andrea Berntzen), looking into the camera, at the beginning of this real time telling of the story of the Utøya massacre perpetrated by Anders Behring Breivik. Kaja isn’t talking to us but to her mother, but clearly the target of this...

London Film Festival 2018: First look reviews – Tumbbad and Girl

Tumbbad India’s cinema industry is the biggest in the world, and it often bothers me that I know so little about it, whether that means the Bollywood mainstream or something like Tumbbad, which feels much more independent in spirit. Told across three chapters and thirty years, Tumbbad sets up its...

Flashbacks To 1993: Malice and Cool Runnings

MaliceAh the yuppie thriller, a preserve of the late 80s and early 90s that dealt with the fear of home, family and prosperity being invaded by an outside source. There was an attempt to revive the subgenre a few years back (which failed with the release of The Resident, which...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Mandy

When his beloved wife Mandy (Andrea Riseborough) is murdered in front of him by a gang of ‘Jesus freak’ bikers on industrial strength LSD, Red Miller (Nicolas Cage) goes on a rage, booze and drug fuelled rampage of bloody revenge. Just look at that summary. How cool does that sound?...

London Film Festival 2018: First Look Review – Lizzie

True crime is big business at the moment. Documentaries like Making a Murderer, Casting Jonbenet and The Staircase and podcasts like Sword and Scale, Generation Why and Casefile generate large audiences and discussion. There are though certain crimes that transcend the regular true crime audience and pass into the wider...

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