Leslie Byron Pitt

Leslie Byron Pitt

Leslie Byron Pitt is a film blogger, podcast host, and aspiring amateur photographer, who works in interior sales.

He’s currently working on building his portfolio of works.

Leslie studied Film and Video Production at Bucks New University (formerly BCUC). He lives in the home countries.

Free Fire: Film Review

Free Fire: Film Review

A group of shady individuals accumulate in an abandoned Boston warehouse to size up and complete an arms deal. However, when some bad blood infiltrates the proceedings, the deal swiftly falls south, and the guns which were going to be used for other nefarious purposes are now being utilised a...

DVD Review: Central Intelligence

DVD Review: Central Intelligence

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer When Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson original left the WWE to become a movie star, it was easy to see him as a star in the same vein as Arnold Schwarzenegger: A heavyweight presence who may not have a decent set of thespian chops, and would...

DVD Review: Notes on Blindness

DVD Review: Notes on Blindness

By Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer A recreational documentary in a similar vein to The Arbour (2010) or Dreams of a Life (2011), Notes on Blindness details us of the grand upheaval taken of famed academic John Hull as he loses his sight days after the birth of his first son. Directors...

DVD Review: The Hills Have Eyes

DVD Review: The Hills Have Eyes

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer When we consider early Wes Craven films, it is Last House on the Left (1972) which often grabs the plaudits for the way it helped redefine the horror genre with its grimness. While this is true, in terms of craft, The Hills Have Eyes is...

DVD Review: Fight Valley

DVD Review: Fight Valley

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer It’s hard to say too much about Fight Valley. It’s very hard to say anything particularly pleasant. There’s nothing more painful for a film writer, than viewing a film that doesn’t emit any pleasure in any moment of its running time. You don’t watch a...

DVD Review: Money Monster

DVD Review: Money Monster

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Money Monster comes in at a lean 90 minutes and only flounders once or twice. Partly because it’s a film with a fair amount of moving parts. But also because it pulls a few of its punches. It becomes clear that director Jodie Foster doesn’t...

Blu-Ray Review: Love and Friendship

Blu-Ray Review: Love and Friendship

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer When you see the words Jane Austin Adaptation, it's hard not to think of direct Whit Stillman. In fact, it's surprising that we'd not seen a Stillman interpretation of Austin’s work until now. The writer-director’s particular brand of waspy angst, snappy quips and social mores...

DVD Review: The Nice Guys

DVD Review: The Nice Guys

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer A fellow writer once nailed an aspect about movies that some secretly (some not so secretly) enjoy in one sentence when in debate with an associate: “Movies are often at their most interesting when they are problematic”. Granted, this was caught by me on a...

DVD Review: Level Up

DVD Review: Level Up

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Ten minutes into Level Up, you can already feel the threads unravel from its tapestry. Anyone with a toe in the waters of pop culture can already see the similarities of Level Up with recent feature Nerve (2016). In fact, the film doesn’t feel too...

Blu-Ray Review: A Hologram for the King

Blu-Ray Review: A Hologram for the King

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afroilmviewer Despite featuring the ever affable Tom Hanks and adapted from a well-known and enjoyed author, A Hologram for the King (novel by Dave Eggers) received a rather muted reception when realised earlier this year. The film was only really rivalled by Sing Street in the...

Review: Set the Thames on Fire

Review: Set the Thames on Fire

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt When it comes to the creative process, one should admire the ambition. When reading reviews of artistic endeavours, it seems that sometimes writers appear to forget that they are critiquing the efforts of a crew that have clearly worked hard to attempt to bring together...

DVD Review: Miles Ahead

DVD Review: Miles Ahead

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt The fact that the box office chatter about Suicide Squad has droned on longer than Miles Ahead’s U.K theatrical run, says two things to me. One: Cinematic conversation must improve. Two: Thank goodness physical media is still (just barely) being purchased by folk. Don Cheadle’s...

Blu-Ray Review: Louder Than Bombs

Blu-Ray Review: Louder Than Bombs

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Louder than Bombs deals with an ex-actor (Gabriel Byrne) and his two sons (Devin Druid and Jesse Eisenberg) try their best to confront their fractured feelings of their lives and each other on the eve of an exhibition of their deceased wife and mother (Isabelle...

DVD Review: Poor Cow

DVD Review: Poor Cow

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt In Poor Cow; Joy (Carol White) may be the name of the woman we watch in this slice of life tale, yet as we observe this young woman’s life, we sense that joy is merely a title for her. She gains little pleasure from the...

Review: The Shallows

Review: The Shallows

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt B-Movies: When you keep them simple and sharp, you often heed the best results. The Shallows never overstays its welcome, nor does it overcomplicate its obvious silliness. It takes a Dario Argento approach towards proceedings. As much as we like to often deny our baser...

DVD Review: Eddie The Eagle

DVD Review: Eddie The Eagle

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt I can’t remember the time I saw a film so incredibly inoffensive. Usually, as a film writer, one is often attracted to a film with an intense, diverse reaction. Dexter Fletcher’s Eddie the Eagle; the colourful true story of Eddie Edwards, the tenacious underdog whose...

Blu-Ray Review: Mirror

Blu-Ray Review: Mirror

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt "Tarkovsky for me is the greatest (director), the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream." – Ingmar Bergman The films of Andrei Tarkovsky demand attention in a way that...

Projectors have come a long way: Epson eh-tw5350 Review

DVD Review: High-Rise

Review By Leslie Byron Pitt As the United Kingdom almost begrudgingly trudges towards Brexit and certain political parties seem hell bent on eating each other alive, my second viewing of High-Rise has firmly confirmed that it's one of the best films of the year. Ben Wheatley's adaptation of 70’s civilisation...

Review: The BFG

Review: The BFG

Review By Leslie Byron Pitt Steven Spielberg's first Disney branded film (it's weird that it's taken so long), is a rather wistful adaptation of the beloved Roald Dahl book The BFG. The novel, which is over 30 years old, tells a light-hearted tale of an orphaned little girls relationship with...

DVD Review: River

DVD Review: River

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt The movie River involves a young American doctor (Rossif Sutherland) who doesn't know when to stop, intervening a sexual assault while on sabbatical in Lao. His violent intrusion leads to the assailant's body being found in the Mekong river the next day. This leaves the...

DVD Review: The Trust

DVD Review: The Trust

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt The often main theme that is heard at the beginning and end of The Trust, is a welcoming and funky track but it does little to perk up the bland existence of this laborious heist film. The Trust opens with one of its main characters;...

DVD Review: Mustang

DVD Review: Mustang

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Deniz Gamze Ergüven's expressive tale of female empowerment is as emotive as it is relevant. It communicates its simple tale with an understated eloquence, never feeling sentimental or forced. The film location and religious culture may feel miles away, but it's sensibilities are universal. From...

DVD Review: Anomalisa

DVD Review: Anomalisa

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt This film broke me. Perhaps it was the all too real nods to customer services. The seminars, the platitudes and the like. It might have been the brilliant chemistry between the cast. The voices of David Thewlis and Jenifer Jason Leigh provide a spark so...

DVD/Blu-Ray Review: Queen of Earth

DVD/Blu-Ray Review: Queen of Earth

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt “Why are these people, friends?” Is the type of question you could find yourself asking when observing Alex Ross Perry’s quietly startling Queen of Earth. And rightly so. The film froths with a near overbearing deep-seated resentment which could make the psycho-biddies of the sixties...

DVD Review: Son of Saul

DVD Review: Son of Saul

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Son of Saul is the type of movie that has to be seen when the viewer in the right state of mind. Least they find themselves equally as trapped within the films tight compositions, as the titular Saul. A Jewish–Hungarian prisoner held within the confines...

Review: The Colony

Review: The Colony

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer The Q&A which occurred after the Vue Piccadilly screening of The Colony was one embossed with passion. Director Florian Gallenberger’s near stream-of-consciousness speeches flowed around the auditorium with not only a sense of humility but also a sense of anxiety. At times his voice cracked....

DVD Review: The Here After

DVD Review: The Here After

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Magnus von Horn’s frosty debut feature; The Here After, has the lead; John (Ulrik Munther), looking to start anew after serving two years in prison for a violent crime. What occurred is revealed slowly in muted detail. We know enough to understand what happened, but...

Review: Now You See Me 2

Review: Now You See Me 2

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer It’s a good guess that the Now You See Me franchise will be the closest thing the younger set of Millennials will get to an Ocean Eleven series. They have the same amount of gloss and slick pizzazz you’d expect from something from Soderbergh's trio...

DVD Review: Triple 9

DVD Review: Triple 9

Review by Michael McNulty John Hillcoat’s newest film, Triple 9 is a tense corrupt cop, crime thriller, with a star lineup that’s hard to rival. Sure, the plot is shakier than the camerawork on Cloverfield, packed with genre clichés, predictable plot points, and one of Kate Winslet’s most questionable performances...

DVD Review: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

DVD Review: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Burr Steers’ (Igby Goes Down) Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, much like a particular brand of wood varnish, delivers exactly what is said on the tin. This film is based on Jane Austen’s seminal novel and features the undead. A drab way to start this...

DVD Review: Trumbo

DVD Review: Trumbo

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer As we are seemingly embarking on a more skeptical and paranoid, right-leaning era, it's more than a little disheartening that Trumbo pulls it's lefty punches and holds no real political relevancy. Whether this is partly due to the film being made way before the feverish...

TV Review: Preacher Episode 2: See

TV Review: Preacher Episode 2: See

Review by Ben Holliday After a two-week hiatus, Preacher makes an explosive return to our screens with Episode 2 exclusively on Amazon Prime Video in the UK. Similarly, to the first episode, this was a slow burner, tentatively building the suspense surrounding our main cast of characters. However, episode 2 makes...

DVD Review: 600 Miles

DVD Review: 600 Miles

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Gabriel Ripstein’s minimalist 600 Miles has a naïve, young gun runner (Kristyan Ferrer) deciding that the best thing to do with an injured ATF agent (Tim Roth) is to take him hostage. It’s a novice mistake and one that many could only see happening in...

DVD Review: I am Wrath

DVD Review: I am Wrath

Review by Ben New There are two basic types of proper rubbish films; ones that know they are rubbish and ones that don’t. The perfect example of the latter would be Tommy Wiseau’s The Room which, although could be described as the Kruger-Dunning effect 24 times a second, becomes almost...

DVD/Blu-Ray Review: Youth

DVD/Blu-Ray Review: Youth

Review By Michael McNulty You may find it difficult to decide how to feel about Youth, Paolo Sorrentino’s most recent cinematic offering.  Set in a luxury spa hotel in the Swiss Alps, the film has a quiet melancholy about it with an undercurrent of comedy flowing beneath the surface. Youth’s...

DVD Review: Mavis!

DVD Review: Mavis!

Reviewed by Miranda Schiller @mirandadadada Mavis! explores the life and career of Mavis Staples, from her beginnings as a young girl performing gospel songs with her dad Pops and her siblings as the Staples Singers, through their transition to soul, some of her most important collaborations, and the ups and...

Review: Bad Neighbours 2

Review: Bad Neighbours 2

Review by Ben Holliday/@bholliday Bad Neighbours 2 follows a trend of sequels that weren’t asked for nor needed but thankfully, that is where the similarities with poor 2016 comedy sequels end. The Nicholas Stoller helmed sequel is full of laughs and most surprisingly of attempts to tackle societal issues. With...

Review: Spotlight

Review: Spotlight

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt/@Afrofilmviewer Carl Bernstein: All these neat, little houses and all these nice, little streets... It's hard to believe that something's wrong with some of those little houses. Bob Woodward: No, it isn't.    - All The President Men, 1976, Alan J. Pakula. Like so many recent Oscar...

Review: X-Men Apocalypse

Review: X-Men Apocalypse

Review by Ben Holliday X-Men: Apocalypse is the latest entry in the 16 year old franchise and marks the fourth time director Bryan Singer has helmed an X-Men picture. Unfortunately, it may be time for him to move on from the genre he helped create. The film starts off strong...

Review: Room

Review: Room

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Note: This review contains what could be considered mild spoilers Twenty four year old Joy (Brie Larson) and her son Jack (Jacob Trembley) live as hostages inside a squalid shed in Ohio, which they describe as Room. They eat, sleep and exercise all within this...

Review: Everybody Wants Some!!

Review: Everybody Wants Some!!

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Moments after the title credits for Everybody Wants Some pop on the screen, it’s clear to many that College was never like this. But director Richard Linklater’s latest feature is the type of coming of age film that allows a few viewers to wallow into...

Review: Green Room

Review: Green Room

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Jeremy Saulnier’s stomach churning thriller; Green Room hits you with the blunt force of a dull cleaver. Its execution is brutal, it's characters timely and its tension more than palpable. Saulnier previously delved into the mundane yet murky effects of amateur revenge in his earlier...

Review: Arabian Nights: The Enchanted One

Review: Arabian Nights: The Enchanted One

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt Arabian Nights finishes in very much the same it started two volumes ago: Obliquely. As mentioned in a previous instalment, praise cannot go high enough for Miguel Gomes ambition to capture his home country in a desolate state of stasis.  Ravaged by austerity, in the...

Review: Arabian Nights: The Desolate One

Review: Arabian Nights: The Desolate One

Review by Leslie Byron Pitt The second section of Miguel Gomes’ Portuguese austerity odyssey doesn’t lighten the load in anyway, though at time it feels more engaging than the previous entry. This section features more nude women that play along with its fantasy elements. Unfortunately, two of the tales featured...

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