Kit Power

Kit Power

Whitney: Can I be Me Review

By Linda Marric In Whitney Can I Be Me, renowned British documentarian Nick Broomfield lift the lid on the life of one of the most famous pop stars of our time, and does his best to discover the secret behind her untimely demise at the age of 48. Broomfield uses...

Forgotten Film Friday: Sex Lies and Videotape

By Michael McNulty Sex, Lies, and Videotape was supposedly showing at a West Berlin cinema when the wall fell and residents from the East descended on the cinema expecting to see a pornographic film. Those who stuck around to watch the film, once they realized it wasn’t a skin flick,...

David Lynch: The Art Life: Doc Review

Wyndham Hacket Pain @WyndhamHP David Lynch is one of film’s most striking and unique directors. In the 40 years since his debut feature Eraserhead he has created some of the most singular works in modern American film. It is therefore a real challenge for a documentary about such a figure...

Top Five Films Set in London

By Michael McNulty Paris and New York are more often the cities romanticized on the silver screen, from the gritty streets of the Bronx to the arty cafes of Montemarte. But let’s not forget about the island that sits in the middle and the city at its centre, London. Here...

Forgotten Film Friday: Eating Raoul

By Michael McNulty Murder, sex, and a little cannibalism thrown in, that’s what Eating Raoul, Paul Bartel’s 1982 film, has on offer. For some it will be too outrageous, for others it will feel like a played down John Water flick, never quite committing to the true nature of its...

Hidden Figures: DVD Review

By Wyndham Hacket Pain It is easy to get caught up in the annual awards coverage and forget that entries are films, and not just news stories. Articles surrounding Hidden Figures have placed a large emphasis on its diverse cast and how it is somehow an antidote to the failings...

The Last Word: Film Review

By Anna Power An intergenerational female friendship flick with some nice ideas at its core but like so many others panders to schmaltz in its execution, though not unenjoyably so. Octogenarian Harriet Lauler (Shirley MacLaine) lives a loveless life. Her days roll on relentlessly; her pristine home a prison of...

Midwife: Film Review

Wyndham Hacket Pain @WyndhamHP At a time in the year when the cinemas are filled with action blockbusters and superhero franchises it can be easy to overlook films about the seemingly mundane and every day. There is a wonderful humility to The Midwife that has no pretensions and just aims...

Origins Plantscription Skincare Range: Review

By Anna Power The Midult years hit you less like a speeding train and more like a creeping vine that sneaks up on you – slowly, throttling you face and neck first. You may have bopped your way across the dance floor in your twenties and thirties; downed beers, puffed...

Pilgrimage: DVD Review

by Leslie Byron Pitt Brutal from the outset, and leaner than bison meat, Brendan Muldowney’s Pilgrimage may not hold the same relentlessness as Neil Marshall’s historic chase feature Centurion (2010), but it’s a film which holds scenes of a latent potency when it breaks free of it’s relaying of the...

Carol Joy Pure Collagen Spray: Review

By Anna Power It’s rare to find a product that makes you want to grab your phone and ring your friends to tell them about it, but Carol Joy’s Pure Collagen Spray is one of those rare exceptions. Within minutes of spraying my face, neck and décolletage the difference was...

Despicable Me 3: Film Review

By Linda Marric Now in its third instalment the Despicable Me franchise is well on the way to cementing its reputation as one of the most popular animation series beyond the world of Pixar and Disney. Having regaled children and their parents with two highly enjoyable features, the Minions, Gru...

Forgotten Film Friday: Dead End Drive-In

By Michael McNulty In the library of exploitation cinema there is an entire wing dedicated to Australia and sitting on one of the many shelves, undoubtedly covered in a thin coat of dust, is one of Ozploitations best offerings, Brian Trenchard-Smiths 1986 Dead End Drive-In. A Mad Max meets The...

Risk: Film Review

By Linda Marric Director Laura Poitras (Citizenfour, 2014) spent 6 arduous and paranoia-filled years documenting the life of one of the most controversial figures in recent times. In Risk, Academy Awards winner Poitras offers a fascinating character study of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, and charters in a very detailed fashion...

Okja: Film Review

By Linda Marric Fresh from igniting a lively debate about Netflix and their validity as fully fledged competitors at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Okja finally arrives to Netflix for the rest of us to devour. Directed by Bong Joon Ho (The Host, 2006) and co-written by British writer Jon...

A Man Called Ove: Film Review

Wyndham Hacket Pain @WyndhamHP Based on the bestselling novel by Fredrick Blackman of the same name, A Man Called Ove follows Ove, a grumpy old man with a similar facial expression to that of John Sergeant, whose interests include Saab cars, making sure his neighbours are well behaved, and visiting...

Hampstead: Film Review

By Linda Marric Loosely based on real life events and staring two of the most accomplished actors of their generation, Hampstead is a big-hearted romantic comedy which is only slightly let down by a less than believable narrative and an even more far-fetched premise. Directed by Joel Hopkins and written...

Edith Walks: Film Review

By Michael McNulty Andrew Kötting’s Edith Walks is an absurdist, quasi-journey, experimental documentary that follows Kötting and a merry band of travellers (the role of Edith played by singer Claudia Barton, complete with irritating pixie girl voice and flowing medieval gown) as they walk from Waltham Abbey via Battle Abbey...

The Book of Henry: Film Review

By Linda Marric One thing is sure about Colin Trevorrow’s The Book of Henry is that it has managed to polarise opinions from one extreme to the other. There are those who simply don't get what the fuss is about, and those who will see beyond its obvious flaws and...

20th Century Women: DVD Review

By Linda Marric 20th Century Women sees the return of Beginners (2010) director Mike Mills in one of the most ambitiously stylish and quirky pieces of filmmaking of recent years. Being no stranger to technical wizardry from his years in the music video industry, Mills offers his audience an exhilarating...

Forgotten Film Friday: In the Mood for Love

By Michael McNulty There’s nothing forgettable about In the Mood for Love, but and be honest, when was the last time you thought about whacking it on the DVD player and settling in to watch it on a Friday night? Released in 2000, Wong Kar Wai’s film was fifteen months...

Churchill: Film Review

By Linda Marric To have a film based on Winston Churchill is one thing, to have it based on particularly dark episode in the mans’s life is another thing altogether. In Churchill Jonathan Teplitzky offers a historical biopic like no other. Spanning, not years, but rather a few days in...

Rock Dog: Film review

By Linda Marric J.K Simmons, Eddie Izzard and Luke Wilson stars in Ash Brannon’s new animation feature about a Tibetan mastiff dog who dreams of becoming a rock star. This cute and thoroughly likeable movie does a good job in keeping you entertained, but is sadly let down by a...

Destination Unknown: Doc Review

By Michael McNulty Ed Mosberg opens Destination Unknown slowly dressing into his perfectly preserved concentration camp uniform. Its thick black stripes serve as a morbid metaphor for his continued emotional imprisonment, for although Ed and the 12 others who feature in this documentary are survivors of the horrors of the...

Whitney: Can I Be Me – Doc Review

By Linda Marric In Whitney Can I Be Me, renowned British documentarian Nick Broomfield lift the lid on the life of one of the most famous pop stars of our time, and does his best to discover the secret behind her untimely demise at the age of 48. Broomfield uses...

Dying Laughing: Film Review

By Wyndham Hacket Pain @WyndhamHP It is hard not to admire stand-up comedians who night after night seemingly achieve the impossible and manage to hold audiences in wonder as they stand on stage and tell jokes. At the same time there are films and television programs that despite their large budgets...

Stockholm My Love: Film Review

By Michael McNulty Mark Cousins’ Stockholm My Love is an exercise in patience. A frustratingly dull film with the pretentions of a film school graduate, who has gorged on likes of filmmakers such as Terrence Malick, then picked up a camera and disappeared down a rabbit hole of contemplation, exploring...

Forgotten Film Friday: Les Diaboliques

By Michael McNulty Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 horror thriller Les Diaboliques was based on the novel by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac, (more commonly recognized by their nom de plume Boileau-Narcejac) Celle qui n’etait pas. One of two of their novels that was snapped up and turned into a film, the...

My Cousin Rachel: Exclusive Clip

  My Cousin Rachel is in cinemas from Friday 9th June. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bx0lY2HOWMA&feature=youtu.be   Review by Linda Marric Daphne du Maurier's timeless classic My Cousin Rachel gets a timely adaptation in this dark and beautifully atmospheric production from legendary British director Roger Michell (Notting Hill, The Buddha of Suburbia). First adapted...

My Cousin Rachel: Film Review

By Linda Marric Daphne du Maurier's timeless classic My Cousin Rachel gets a timely adaptation in this dark and beautifully atmospheric production from legendary British director Roger Michell (Notting Hill, The Buddha of Suburbia). First adapted to the screen in the 1950s and staring Olivia de Havilland in the central...

Forgotten Film Friday: The Innocents (1961)

By Michael McNulty Jack Clayton’s horror classic The Innocents, released in 1961 and based on (by way of William Archibald’s play) Henry James’ 1898 novella The Turn of the Screw, is a mysterious and haunting classic Victorian ghost story. The script, which passed through a number of hands, finally ended...

Top Five First Love Films

By Michael McNulty Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist - 2008 Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist may rub many the wrong way, primarily because seeing Michael Cera play yet another straight edge, hipster, sad-sack geekily fumbling through adolescence is a test of patience. But, let it test you. Nick (Michael Cera),...

After the Storm: Film Review

After The Storm is a moving, yet unsentimental portrayal of inter-generational relationships, fraught family dynamics, and the fragility of the human condition. Part time father Ryota (Hiroshi Abe) spends his limited income on gambling, instead of child maintenance, and longs to rekindle the love lost when his ex-wife (Yoko Make)...

My Life as a Courgette: Film Review

Setting a film in an orphanage, one expects a tale filled with suffering. My Life As A Courgette is a creative accomplishment, managing to be heartwarming and light, even when it’s touching upon the dark subject matter of childhood pain and abandonment. This beautifully animated film is based on a...

Top Five Cities As Characters

By Michael McNulty Location, location, location! Here are five films in which the city plays an integral part. 25th Hour – New York City, New York Monty Brogan, a midlevel drug dealer, spends his final hours before beginning a seven year prison sentence for possession and dealing, with his with...

Dough: Film Review

By Michael McNulty John Goldschmidt’s Dough, penned by first time scriptwriters Jonathon Benson and Jez Freedman, feels like an afterschool special that’s trying to take on too much. Race, religion, culture and age, the differences, the divisions, the need to look past them all and come together is what this...

I Am Not Madame Bovary: Film Review

By Linda Marric Directed by Xiaogang Feng and staring Chinese superstar Feng Xiaogang, I am Not Madam Bovary is a film like no other film you’ve seen before. This beautifully crafted and unusually shot film is everything you’d want from a social commentary film. It touches on themes ranging from...

It Was Fifty Years Ago Today: Doc Review

By Linda Marric What more is there to be said about The Beatles that hasn’t already been said before. In It Was 50 Years Ago Today! The Beatles: Sgt Pepper and Beyond, which by all accounts has the clunkiest title for a documentary you could ever think of, director Alan...

Forgotten Film Friday: Belle de Jour

By Michael McNulty Luis Buñuel’s film Belle de Jour, released in 1967, took the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and stands in film history as one of the most, if not the most, erotic films of all time. Based on Joseph Kessel’s, a Russian who lived in Argentina...

TLE Meets: Michael Dudok de Wit

By Linda Marric Considered by many as one of the most talented animators working in Europe at the moment, Michael Dudok de Wit hit the jackpot when he was approached out of the blue by Studio Ghibli to make a film with them. The result was one of the best...

The Other Side of Hope: Film Review

The Other Side of Hope concerns itself with the struggles of two contrasting men who have both left their homes. One is Khlaed (Sherwan Haji), a Syrian asylum seeker who arrives in Helsinki via a dozen other European countries and who hopes to have finally found a new home. The...

The Red Turtle: Film Review

The Red Turtle opens with the sight of a nameless man struggling to stay on-board his small boat in a huge storm. After he wakes on a deserted island, he finds water and fruit to live off, but decides to leave and builds a bamboo raft to sail away on....

Spark: A Space Tale – Film Review

By Linda Marric For an animation film primarily aimed at children, Spark: A Space Tale seems to spend an unusual amount of time trying to please its adult viewers. With multiple attempts at referencing anything from Stars Wars to WALL·E ( Andrew Stanton, 2008), director Aaron Wooley tries his very...

Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazar’s Revenge

By Linda Marric First of all let’s start with the good news, because despite earlier misgiving about yet another outing, there is no doubt that the fifth film in the Pirates of The Caribbean franchise is far more coherent than its most recent predecessor. Yes Salazar’s Revenge is way more...

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