Jim Mackney

Jim Mackney

I am 26 year old freelance audio visual creative and writer. My writing includes film criticism and sports writing. I am also a Media Studies teacher and have been teaching at an inner-city London school for the last four years.

Film Review: Most Beautiful Island

Most Beautiful Island wants you to understand how hard life is for Luciana (played by writer/director Ana Asensio), an immigrant living in New York. The film piles on scene after scene of Luciana not being good enough; she is late for her baby sitting job, has to suffer through the...

Five Great Gruesome Horror Films

The days are growing shorter, the nights are drawing in, and the temperature is plummeting. Horror films are an acquired taste, some people love them and some people despise them. I am firmly in the former camp, and happy to be a fully-fledged, card-holding horror fan. This list looks at...

The School of Life (L’ecole Buissonniere) : Film Review

L’ecole Buissonniere is a slow moving French period drama, one that is perfect for a cold, drizzly Sunday afternoon. This is not intended as a criticism and the film acts in the same way dunking a freshly ripped piece of bread into a steaming bowl of stew is often the...

The Silence of the Lambs: Re-release Review

The Silence of the Lambs is a piece of classic horror cinema, and in the great canon of Hollywood horror it sits happily alongside The Exorcist and Nosferatu. The film is being re-released as part of the “BFI Thriller: Who Can You Trust” season and has been artfully up-scaled and...

Film Review: Zoology

“Zoology” is a film that starts off bleak but ends up becoming enchanting as it move towards its conclusion. Written and directed by Ivan I. Tverdovskiy and starring, Natalya Pavlenkova as the principal character, the story focuses on a middle-aged woman who grows a tail. This may seem like a...

Film Review: Killing Ground

“Killing Ground” is a horror film by Tasmanian born writer-director Damien Power. It is a film that takes its cues from other Australian horror cinema such as Wolf Creek and the film has tones of the low budget British horror, Eden Lake. The film focuses on Sam (Harriet Dyer) and...

‘Back to Burgundy’ (‘Ce qui nous lie’) Review

A sense of history hangs heavy over ‘Back to Burgundy’ (‘Ce qui nous lie’), the new film from French filmmaker, Cedric Klapisch. ‘Back to Burgundy’ is a sentimental film and one that has a very good first act with the strongest writing of the whole film, nicely setting up the...

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