A Girl at My Door : Film Review

By Adam Turner @AdamTurnerPR July Jung's dark drama, A Girl at My Door, explores the troubled lives of two forlorn souls living in a sleepy fishing village in South Korea. Young-nam (Doona Bae) is a dejected police academy officer who has been transferred from Seoul to Yeosu after an unexplained 'police misconduct'. Much to her surprise, she becomes a knight in shining armour to Dohee's (Kim Sae Ron), a local teenager whose life is riddled with torment and misery. In...

Bill’s Horrible History : Interview with director Richard Bracewell

By Toby Venables  @TobyVenables Bill – a new British comedy about Shakespeare’s lost years – brings the Horrible Histories crew together on the big screen for the first time, and on familiar territory. It’s already wowed audiences at the premiere at Cambridge Film Festival – but will it bring about a rock lute revival? Toby Venables talked to director Richard Bracewell. First of all, in a nutshell... In a nutshell, Bill is a comedy about Shakespeare. What Life of Brian...

Containment : Film Review

By Ben New @squareleg A man wakes up, his alarm didn’t go off. He moves to the kitchen, the taps aren’t working. A glance out the window to a neighboring block reveals someone banging at a window, calling for help. We try to leave and the door is glued shut then comes the sledgehammer whacks from one of the neighbor‘s wall, the whole time accompanied from insistent shouting from the elderly neighbor from the other. This is the very intriguing...

Cartel Land : Film Review

By Michael McNulty An intense, thrilling piece of frontline film-making. Cartel Land’s in the thick of it, run and gun, handheld cinematography is enough to enjoy on its own. The film opens in the middle of the Mexican desert in the dead of the night as a group of cartel members cook up a batch of meth. One admits, as thick white smoke swirls in the black around them, that what they are doing is wrong, but that if they...

La Famille Bélier : Film Review

By Miranda Schiller @mirandadadada Paula Bélier is the 17-old-daughter of a cheese farming family in rural France. Early in the morning, she and her younger brother help on the farm, before she cycles to the village to get on the bus that takes her to school in the nearest town. On the bus, she handles all of her family's business phone calls: She is the only hearing person in her family. Both her parents and her brother are deaf.  ...

Life : Film Review

By Ellery Nick @Ellery_Nick Director Anton Corbijn takes us back to 1950s Los Angeles where a photographer is pursuing a debutante actor on the cusp of stardom. With a little luck that golden quiffed kid might just be his ticket away from snapping starlets on red carpets and back to good ol’New York where being a creative means something.   And so Dennis Stock tries to pin down the elusive James Dean. Both are young artists who share a similar...

45 Years : Film Review

By Stephen Mayne @finalreel So often in 45 Years a crescendo beckons, and just as often Andrew Haigh steps nimbly away. His third feature, a superb achievement, is far too accomplished a creation to sully the relationship at the heart of proceedings with something as crass as a blunt emotional punchline. This is an altogether more complex and rewarding experience, one that asks a hell of a lot of its two leads, and receives even more in return. The first...

The Wolfpack : Film Review

By Leslie Byron Pitt The more you consider the bizarre tale of The Wolfpack, that harder it is for you to bend your head fully round it. The documentary about seven siblings, homeschooled and confined in their Lower East Side Manhattan apartment, away from the waking world by their father, evokes grim thoughts of the deplorable Josef Fritzl. This tale not as grievous as the acts of Fritzl, yet it does ponder a certain amount of concern. We observe Angulo...

The Dance of Reality : Film Review

By Stephen Mayne @finalreel Has it really been 25 years since maverick Chilean Alejandro Jodorowsky last released a film? Such is his ability to burn surreal imagery permanently into my memory, it’s hard to believe he’s been absent for so long. Not that he’s been resting on his laurels of course. The intervening years since The Rainbow Thief (1990) have seen him dabbling in a wide array of cultural pursuits, from theatre to comics. It’s good to have him back...

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