Company director jailed after caught speeding in customised white Range Rover five times in month

A company director was jailed after being caught speeding in his customised white Range Rover five times in a month.

Tauqir Khan lied to police to avoid charges – claiming that somebody else was behind the wheel of his £93,000 motor.

The 47-year-old was caught speeding on Tower Bridge in 2014, before he was clocked in Northamptonshire and Warwickshire.

But he gave a false name, which lead to 11 people getting a call from the cops, none of whom had ever known Khan.

City of London Police only caught up with Khan after they traced his mobile phone.

Khan, from Ilford, east London was found guilty of perverting the course of justice after a three day trial earlier this month.

He was jailed for eight months on November 28, ordered to pay a £2000 fine and was also disqualified from driving for 27 months.

Over a three day trial, Inner London Crown Court heard how Khan ran RHP Services – a family-run residential property business.

During sentencing, Judge Davies QC described Khan’s actions as “striking right at the heart of the judicial process”.

He said a huge amount of police time had been taken on the case, adding that “an immediate custodial sentence was appropriate.”

PC Michael Martin from the City of London Police said: “This case shows how seriously we take traffic offences and that nobody is above the law.

“Serial offenders will be brought before the courts to face the consequences of their actions which can’t just be swept under the carpet.

“Speeding can endanger not just the driver’s life but also other law-abiding road users and will not be tolerated.

“Today’s sentencing illustrates just how severe your punishment can be, not only if you continuously break the speed limit, but also if you waste police time by providing false information and not owning up to your actions.

“Failure to comply with a request to identify the driver of a vehicle at the time of an offence, or giving false information, is viewed by the courts as an attempt to undermine the fundamental process of law, the repercussions of which Mr Khan is now realising.”

By Daniel Hammond

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2 Responses

  1. Simon Rook

    “Speeding can endanger not just the driver’s life but also other law-abiding road users and will not be tolerated.
    Maybe so, but there was no evidence HE was speeding, nor was he convicted of speeding.

    “Today’s sentencing illustrates just how severe your punishment can be, not only if you continuously break the speed limit, but also if you waste police time by providing false information and not owning up to your actions.
    No it doesn’t, he was convicted of perverting the course of justice, not speeding nor wasting police time.

    “Failure to comply with a request to identify the driver of a vehicle at the time of an offence, or giving false information, is viewed by the courts as an attempt to undermine the fundamental process of law, the repercussions of which Mr Khan is now realising.”
    He didn’t fail to reply though which is a much less serious offence

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