Global warming? Scotland’s longest lasting patch of snow to melt this weekend…only happened six times in 300 years!

Scotland is set to lose its longest-lasting patch of snow this weekend for the first time in over a decade — an event which has happened only six times in the past 300 years.

The patch at Garbh Choire Mor on Braeriach in the Cairngorms, nicknamed the Sphinx, may be gone as soon as this weekend.

Iain Cameron, 44, monitors snow patches across Britain as a hobby and his findings are published by the Royal Meteorological Society.

The last snow patch on Garbh Choire Mor on Braeriach in the Cairngorms onSeptember 16 2017. It is expected to melt away in the coming days.

All of the snow in Britain has melted only six times in the past 300 years – in 1933, 1953, 1959, 1996, 2003 and 2006.

Iain, a Stirling-based ‘snow patcher’, said: “It’s always disappointing when they do eventually melt but it’s just one of those things.

The last snow patch on Garbh Choire Mor on Braeriach in the Cairngorms on August 27 2017. It is expected to melt away in the coming days.

“We’ll just have to wait until next year to see them again.”

Cameron discovered his love for monitoring snow patches aged 9 when he noticed a patch of snow in Loch Lomond during the summer.

The last snow patch(L) on Garbh Choire Mor on Braeriach in the Cairngorms on August 27 2017.

He works as a health and safety manager for an aerospace company in Edinburgh and does all of his snow patch monitoring work for free.

This weekend, Cameron will travel up to see the Sphinx as it melts in the hopes of catching it happen, something that has never been chronicled before.

The last snow patch on Garbh Choire Mor on Braeriach in the Cairngorms onSeptember 16 2017.

A second patch of snow, which Cameron also believes will melt this weekend, lies 3,133 ft up at Aonach Beag.

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