Joe Mellor

Joe Mellor

Head of News & Social Media at The London Economic

DOES THE UK STILL NEED INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY?

By Valentina Magri International Women’s Day – observed by the UN General Assembly since 1977 after it invited member nations to unite in eliminating the discrimination against women – was celebrated this weekend with great success, but some still question the need for such a day in contemporary British society. Gender...

Will We Commit a Syrial Offense?

By Lock Bailey One may criticise the United States' involvement in other countries and in other regions' affairs and do so justifiably. Yet often within the very same condemning breath one may also plead for the United States' involvement and intervention in another area of the world. The Civil War in...

We Are The 99%…Aren’t We?

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent  Since the global recession struck we have cut society into two vastly unequal groups as a means of pigeon holing blame. The one per cent - those with a total household income that exceeds £300,000 annually – have become targets in the financial downturn. The...

SAVE THE LAST PENCE

By Valentina Magri The Bank of England (BoE) gave us both good and bad news during the presentation of the last inflation report in February. The good news: the UK will be one of the fastest-growing advanced economies, with a GDP growth equal to +2.6 per cent. The bad news:...

The big Twitter study

Why did you click through? We’ve set up a phony feature to plug on Twitter in order to decipher how people think and act on the internet. The results from the survey below will form part of an editorial called ‘Klout’, which will be published when the figures have been...

President Clinton: The Sequel

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent  Hillary Rodham Clinton will run for President of the United States in 2016 OK. It’s not confirmed yet, but it does seem fairly certain; Hillary Clinton will run for presidency in 2016. There won’t, of course, be an announcement for another twelve months or so as...

The great London housing crisis

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic  The great London housing crisis is a potent example of how capitalist structures fail when left to their own devices. Mayor of London Boris Johnson believes we would be utterly nuts as a society if we "slammed the door" on wealthy foreigners...

Environmental challenges of urbanisation

By Stephen Angus Peter Junor China’s urbanisation plan is designed to boost the economy by increasing domestic consumption and connecting more people to the global workplace. The government also hope to improve living standards for everyone, but urbanisation can have drastic and irreversible effects on the environment while also reshaping the...

A Nation once again?

By Tomás McGoldrick, Ireland Correspondent The recent Vision Critical poll of people in what could be known as ‘rest of the UK’ found that 62 per cent wanted Scotland to stay in the Union and 38 per cent are happy to see Scotland go it alone. It would have been interesting to...

As the violence ends, the guns are drawn

By Joe Mellor, Deputy Editor As Viktor Yanukovych became the world’s most wanted man, the US declares Ukraine is “under new management.” But could this inflammatory language further damage relations with a wounded Russia? Ukraine's interim President Olexander Turchynov has warned of the dangers of separatism following the ousting of...

A new dawn in Italy

By Luca Foschi “Plain living and high thinking,” declared Italy’s incoming Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, quoting William Wordsworth during his speech at the Democratic Party’s (PD) national assembly on February the 13th. He entered the rooms of Via del Nazareno in Rome as Mayor of Florence and Secretary General of...

Techonomics

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent The Digital-Savvy Generation Rises To Power Facebook has acquired mobile phone messaging app WhatsApp for a total of $19 billion, giving them a bigger corporate value than giants such as American Airlines, Ralph Lauren and Tiffany. Launched in 2009 the app was based on a £0.79 subscription...

Burying Thatcher’s legacy

By Pieter Cranenbroek, International Politics Blogger Margaret Thatcher may be dead but her legacy lives on. Good for her, bad for us. When she rose to power 35 years ago she was determined to reverse “the corrosive and corrupting effects of socialism”. However, it has become abundantly clear that her policies...

The demonised deceased

By Nathan Lee, Politics and Finance writer  Was Margaret Thatcher demonised for the right reasons, why did people hate her, and to what extent did the unions warp our perception of the long-standing politician? Margaret Thatcher was born of a working class family, but died the most victimised member of...

It wasn’t acceptable in the 80’s

By Joe Mellor, Deputy Editor  “Thatcher, Thatcher life snatcher” might have been a more apt rhyme for the Iron Lady after research from Durham University revealed that Mrs T’s policies caused “unjust premature death”. Just to clear things up, she didn’t wield her own weapons against the general population (she...

Kejriwal and The Aam Aadmi Party

By Nishad Sanzagiri The Aam Aadmi Party should stop playing ‘Aam Aadmi’ Politics It is all over national and international news: Arvind Kejriwal, the founder of the popular Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), resigned from his post as Chief Minister of Delhi as a result of the state assembly blocking an...

State of the Union

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent  What can be expected from Obama in 2014? The current United States Congress, one of the most powerful legislative branches of government in the world, has been the most ineffective since the dawn of the Republic. How ineffective? Of the 5,700 bills proposed last year...

The Oval Hates the Square

by Lock Bailey Why Washington’s Oval Office never supported the Egyptian revolution on Tahrir Square If for thirty years Hosni Mubarak played the violin while Egypt burned, then the United States tightened the strings and provided the bow. Yet many Americans look aghast and astounded when they see that the...

Long Live the Radio

By Stuart Buchanan, Junior Broadcast Executive at 4mediarelations  There was a time when most homes relied on a radio. The wireless, sat in the corner of the kitchen or living room was a key transmitter of news, a primary source of entertainment and a pioneering medium for releasing the latest...

The Four Freedoms

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic One of Britain’s biggest exporters shows the power of the four freedoms. In July 2011 the decision of the British government to award a £1.4 billion Thameslink contract to German firm Siemens was met with uproar. To quote the Daily Mail (deplorable...

Urbanisation and China’s future

By Stephen Angus Peter Junor Since economic reforms implemented by Deng Xiaoping in the late 1970’s, urbanisation in China has been relentless and it shows no signs of slowing down. Poor economic policy along with labour and market restrictions had previously suppressed urban growth, but since then China has developed into...

Storm in a coffee cup

By Philip Benton  Vietnam is a country famous for its delicious cuisine, motorbikes and thanks to Top Gear’s Vietnam Special, massive model boats. But perhaps you were unaware that it also plays an instrumental role in producing the world’s second most valuable traded commodity – coffee. A thriving coffee industry...

Yes: Scotland’s UK Future: Nasty, Brutish, and Short

By Pete Ramand and James Foley, authors of Yes: The Radical Case for Scottish Independence. Some call it the dismal science.  But, of all the referendum’s controversies, economics arouses the nastiest emotions. The media, along with No campaign leaders, frame the problem of Scotland’s economic security around Alex Salmond’s personal credibility,...

The four enemies of the British recovery

by Valentina Magri According to IMF forecasts, Britain will enjoy a bigger increase in GDP than any other country in Europe after being upgraded from 1.9 per cent to 2.4 per cent. But there are at least four risk factors that may weaken the recovery. Puzzling politics There is a...

The New Way

By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter Exclusive interview with Mr Cannabis on his new smoked out coffee shop dream. A man known as “Mr Cannabis” has failed in another a new attempt to open a cannabis café in the UK. He rose to fame in 2000 when he gave the...

God save us a queen

By Pieter Cranenbroek, International Politics Blogger European society has altered dramatically in the past centuries, yet one component has survived the test of time: the royal family. Despite our efforts to make society fairer, more democratic and with equal rights for everyone, this symbol of inequality has proved irremovable. ‘Keeping’ the royal...

Syria’s Political Nightmare

By Ollie Ward Geneva II Talks Begin The Geneva II peace talks are underway and judging by the fact that Assad’s regime and the opposition barely spoke directly to each other and the city of Homs remains besieged, expectations seem understandingly low. To describe the meeting as a shambles would be...

Why I gave up my green card

By Jack Peat, Editor of The London Economic TLE editor Jack Peat talks to adventurer, inventor and entrepreneur Jaimie Mantzel about why he gave up his green card and left the US. Jaimie Mantzel’s antics range from the strange to the extraordinary. As a business and politics newspaper, securing a...

The Road to Wigan Pier

By Joe Mellor, In house Reporter  George Orwell is a timeless author who has become more relevant as political systems which sowed their seeds at the start of the 20th century grow into the unrelenting beasts that had been prophesied. The feature below highlights how relevant Orwell's messages are today....

Is London a Drain on the UK?

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent A Northerner’s Perspective London is an economic powerhouse, a hub of global headquarters and a melting pot of cultures, but is it a drain on the rest of the UK? Recently there has been a lot of speculation and debate surrounding the question of whether London has...

Europe and the UK: Never the Twain Shall Meet

By Valentina Magri Do you remember the British sitcom of the Eighties “Never the Twain”? Well, it seems Oliver Smallbridge and Simon Peel may have found their heirs: Europe and the UK. The British PM David Cameron has promised to change Europe with internal negotiation in a more flexible, competitive...

Gun Crime Stalemate in the US

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent The only thing sadder than the shooting of two mall employees in Columbia, Maryland, is that it has become an unsurprising fixture in both American and worldwide news. On Saturday, in a suburb between Washington, DC and Baltimore, Darion Marcus Aguilar opened fire inside a Columbia Mall...

US President: who’s next?

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent 2014 has barely begun, but the American media machine has already put its unremitting reporting on the impending Presidential Election into gear… taking place in November 2016. As RealClearPolitics.com surveys suggests, the popular consensus has former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton for the Democrats fighting...

Does Academia Fuel Elitism?

By Adam Walker, Economics Correspondent Since the financial crisis hit in 2007 there has been a great deal of debate concerning the culture of big business capitalism and the demonisation of the financial industry. The elitism associated with the banking industry, coupled with accusations of political bias, immunity from punitive action...

Age of the CDO

By David Dumeresque of Tyzack Partners The Art of Survival: Adapting to Change in the Digital Era Fifty years ago, Leon Megginson, Professor of Management and Marketing at Louisiana State University wrote in the Southwestern Social Science Quarterly: “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most...

Is the Senate fighting peace?

By Haridos Apostolides, US Correspondent The negotiations that no one, especially American leaders, ever truly believed would happen are, indeed, happening. On January 20th, Iran will enter into negotiations to reduce their nuclear practices with the United States, Great Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia. The new, “more liberal” Iranian president,...

Hollande’s dangerous liaisons

By Pieter Cranenbroek – International Politics Blogger On New Year’s Eve, French President François Hollande announced a series of liberal reforms that meant a move away from socialist thinking. Although the socialist president’s alleged liaison with an actress may have overshadowed his astonishing flirt with liberalism, he would do well to...

Making Winter Warmer

Kerry Lister-Pattinson – 28, founder Making Winter Warmer I'm the type of person who really feels the cold. One especially freezing November night in 2013 a thought popped into my head; 'what must it be like for people living on the streets?' It was that thought that led me on to...

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

By Nathan Lee, Finance and Politics Correspondent  Martin Scorsese’s Wolf of Wall Street rubs salt in the wounds of those most affected by the financial crisis and massages the ego of the bankers who allowed it all to happen.   Five years on from the greatest financial crisis in history and...

No Strings

A No Strings Puppet Workshop For Children From Syria By Rosie Waller, No Strings International  No Strings International makes puppet films that bring to life crucial messages for children in disasters, poverty and war around the world, with their current focus on Syria. Here, Rosie Waller, one of the UK team...

Youth employment: a call to action

By Carlotta Stephens, Commercial Director, Maine-Tucker As a corporate member of the REC (Recruitment and Employment Confederation) I recently attended an event at the House of Lords on the topic of youth employment. Staggeringly there are nearly one million young people in the UK who are neither in work, training or...

Page 158 of 160 1 157 158 159 160