The Embargo: What Is The Frozen Girl About? – The London Economic
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The Embargo: What Is The Frozen Girl About?

Good morning World. This is the media reporting. Until now, we haven’t been “allowed” to report a potentially groundbreaking story, because ultimately the fourth estate is not free. But this is big.

Here’s what you need to know:

A terminally ill teenager has won a historic legal fight to have her body cryogenically frozen in the hope of being brought back to life.

The London teenager was allowed through a legal loophole to take sole control over decisions about the disposal of her body which, according to Mr Justice Jackson, would give her the chance to “live longer”.

According to legal transcripts, the girl had written: “I have been asked to explain why I want this unusual thing done.

“I am only 14-years-old and I don’t want to die but I know I am going to die.

“I think being cryo-preserved gives me a chance to be cured and woken up – even in hundreds of years’ time.

“I don’t want to be buried underground. I want to live and live longer and I think that in the future they may find a cure for my cancer and wake me up.

“I want to have this chance. This is my wish.”

So why no public knowledge until now? Well, according to Mr Justice Jackson, he said nothing about the case could be reported while she was alive because the media coverage would distress her.

He also ruled no-one involved could be identified – again in line with the girl’s wishes. Or is it the wishes of Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Arizona, where bodies are frozen? They charge extortionate fees for the process, and they have no one to testify against them as long as they are dead!

Mr Justice Jackson said the girl’s arrangement cost around £37,000, of which the results are unknown. We do indeed live in unusual times.

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1 Response

  1. Nick Stewart

    The saddest thing about this story is the girls description of death as something for which we can find a “cure” Cryogenesis exploits this human hope – even though there is absolutely no grounds to believe it might ever be fulfilled.

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