Farage is starting to sound like Trump – The London Economic

Farage is starting to sound like Trump

By Harold Stone

Nigel Farage dominated Tuesday’s EU referendum debate. Some of us booed him, but that didn’t stop him getting massive applause.

“Obama is the most anti-British president America has ever had,” was met with cheers from the audience.

“In Brussels,” he continued, “they’re hell-bent on building a European army.”

At this point Nick Clegg intervened, raising his voice to be heard over the crowd,

“The much bigger danger than this fantasy fear of a European army is Vladimir Putin. What does Vladimir Putin want?”

This is where Nigel Farage took a deep breath, his eyes rolled back into his head, and he morphed into Tiny Trump:

“Stop lying. Stop lying to people about this. You lied in fourteen, and you’re lying again. They want a European army, and that’s a fact.”

A few minutes later, when Tiny Trump was invited to speak again, he opened with this:

“Well once again Nick is telling you a complete pack of lies about Norway and their deal. But he’s good at that. He’s done it for a living, for years. [applause] What I would say, I mean. We’re being told – Wouldn’t it be dreadful to be like Norway? How ghastly. Can you imagine being rich? And independent? And happy?”

These are the sort of short and punchy accusations you will recognise if you listen to Donald Trump. Here is an example of Donald in action:

“This guy’s a liar. You have a combination of factors. He can’t do it for obvious reasons, and he can’t do it, because he doesn’t know how to tell the truth.”

This style of speech – with its short, sharp, combative soundbites – is difficult to transcribe. It’s the way people talk when they’re angry, and people tend to be incoherent when they’re angry.

And that, I think, is your simple answer to why people are flocking to America’s Donald Trump and our Tiny Trump. People are angry, and they want to hear people voicing this anger, not politicians explaining things.

A friend and I hung around after the debate to watch the politicians sign letters and pose for selfies. As Tiny Trump was escorted by his henchmen into a big black Land Rover, I turned to a passer-by and said, “check it out, it’s Nigel Farage”.

Their reaction? “Ah great man, great man. The only man up for the job.”

This is not something a lot of us – Guardian readers, London Economic readers – want to hear. It makes us feel uncomfortable.

But we need to start taking Tiny Trump seriously. Not as a serious thinker, but as a serious threat to our freedoms and prosperity.

I despise Farage and everything he stands for, but just mocking and ignoring him won’t stop family and friends voting for him. And they are voting for him. It’s not funny anymore.

5 Responses

  1. Simon

    Harold,

    with all due respect, just how lazy a bit of journalism is this? to come up with the concept Farage is copying Trump is pretty weak.

    I find it totally disappointing that this is what you came out with rather than actually listening to what was said by all four of them, you attempt to project your own bias into this lame report.

    Let’s be clear here, Clegg back in the 2014 debate categorically denied that an EU army was on the cards, see here:

    https://youtu.be/fd9rsmD4HiM?t=15m41s

    are you, two years later, going to accept that this was total hogwash?

    Maybe you would like to talk about the Ukraine?

    Back in 2008, Mr Farage gave this speech:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEyWWZrDoTg

    now, 8 years later, events have proven his point, yet I don’t see a single journalist like yourself ever taking a step back and acknowledging that they got it wrong and Mr Farage identified the problem and predicted the outcome 100%?

    It’s all very easy to snipe from the cossy positions you have writing for all the left wing rags, but at what point do you actually take a look back at yourselves and realise that you have simply got it wrong?

    The EU was a great idea as a trade zone, but the idealistic United States of Europe project is actually leading to greater and greater risk of major conflict with the growing wars on it’s borders (and now major terrorist activity in the EU) and the ever deeper Euro crisis that’s devastating Greece, Spain, Portugal now.

    With all this going on, the best you can come up with is this line:

    “As Tiny Trump was escorted by his henchmen into a big black Land Rover”

    really?

    Is this what passes for Journalism these days?

    1. Stevie V

      Let’s be clear here, Clegg back in the 2014 debate categorically denied that an EU army was on the cards, see here:

      https://youtu.be/fd9rsmD4HiM?t=15m41s

      are you, two years later, going to accept that this was total hogwash?

      LOL. It is total hogwash and Nick was absolutely right.

      Anybody with the slightest grasp of history would know the EEC was pushing for an army back in the days of the Korean war.

      What you’re saying is basically the same as “NHS Privatisation is on the cards”. It may happen. There are people in the government who actively want it to happen. However, in all reality, the suggestion it will definitely happen is complete rubbish.

      All Farage has proven is he is a reactionary idiot, as you clearly are from your “analysis” of the EU.

      1. Simon

        “LOL. It is total hogwash and Nick was absolutely right.

        Anybody with the slightest grasp of history would know the EEC was pushing for an army back in the days of the Korean war.”

        Oh yes, that’s right, all this is a figment of our imaginations?

        I despair at the ignorance and shortsightedness of attitudes like this.

        http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/612710/European-leaders-EU-ARMY-close-to-reality-Juncker

        http://www.thenewfederalist.eu/a-single-european-army-instead-of-28-national-militaries

  2. If anyone is copying anyone’s style. Trump is copying Farage’s. Whether you like Farage is irrelevant, he’s the most popular party leader and certainly the best known politician in the country. Nearly 4m people voted UKIP in the general election last year, who cares what a wannabe Che Guevara thinks?

  3. Young W

    I reckon the writer is mad because Farage came across as a fine bloke who had arguably good points about the EU. So what really the writer attempts to do here is an character assination by trying to link Farage with Trump, which is nonsense.

    It is rather an unpropessional opinion piece without any wits and rational reasoning.

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